Biography of Richard Webb

Picture of Dr. Richard Webb
Full Title: Professor of Physics
Building: Krueger Center
Room Number: 134
Email: riwebb [at] ucollege [dot] edu
Work Phone: 2370
Departments: Division of Science and Mathematics - 402.486.2515
Job Description:

 

Richard is the physics professor at Union College. In addition to teaching physics and astronomy classes, Richard serves as academic adviser for physics majors and students preparing for dental school or radiation technology school. Richard also sponsors the Pre-Health Professionals Club at Union College.

Academic Background
  • Ph.D. in Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, WA. 1995.
  • M.S. in Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, WA. 1990.
  • B.S. in Physics, Loma Linda University, Riverside, CA. 1988.
  • High School Graduate, Monterey Bay Academy, La Selva Beach, CA. 1984.
Professional Background:
  • Professor of Physics, Union College, Lincoln, NE. 2003 - present.
  • Professor of Physics, Pacific Union College, Angwin, CA. 2002-2003.
  • Associate Professor of Physics, Pacific Union College, Angwin, CA. 1998-2002.
  • Assistant Professor of Physics, Pacific Union College, Angwin, CA. 1995-1998.
  • Research Assistant, Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA. 1994-1995.
  • Visiting Scientist, Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan. Summer 1992.
Publications:

[1]

O. V. Fat’yanov, R. L. Webb, and Y. M. Gupta, “Optical transmission through inelastically deformed shocked sapphire: stress and crystal orientation effects,” J. Appl. Phys., vol. 97, no. 12, p. 123529, Jun. 2005.

[2]

T. Lippert, R. L. Webb, S. C. Langford, and J. T. Dickinson, “Dopant induced ablation of poly(methyl methacrylate) at 308 nm,” J. Appl. Phys., vol. 85, no. 3, pp. 1838–1847, Feb. 1999.

[3]

R. L. Webb, S. C. Langford, J. T. Dickinson, and T. K. Lippert, “Sensitization of PMMA to laser ablation at 308 nm,” Appl. Surf. Sci., vol. 127–129, pp. 815–820, May 1998.

[4]

R. L. Webb, J. T. Dickinson, and G. J. Exarhos, “Characterization of Particulates Accompanying Laser Ablation of NaNO3,” Appl. Spectrosc., vol. 51, no. 5, pp. 707–717, May 1997.

[5]

R. L. Webb, S. C. Langford, and J. T. Dickinson, “The role of defects in the rear side laser ablation of MgO at 308 nm,” J. Appl. Phys., vol. 80, no. 12, pp. 7057–7064, Dec. 1996.

[6]

R. L. Webb, “Interactions of UV excimer laser radiation with dielectric materials,” Ph.D., Washington State University, Pullman, WA, 1995.

[7]

R. L. Webb, S. C. Langford, and J. T. Dickinson, “Neutral atom and molecule emission accompanying 248-nm laser irradiation of single crystal NaNO3,” Nucl. Instrum. Meth. B, vol. 103, no. 3, pp. 297–308, Nov. 1995.

[8]

J. T. Dickinson, L. C. Jensen, R. L. Webb, J.-J. Shin, and S. C. Langford, “The role of defects in the laser ablation of wide bandgap materials,” in Proceedings of the SPIE, Boulder, CO, 1994, vol. 2114, pp. 116–126.

[9]

J. T. Dickinson, L. C. Jensen, R. L. Webb, and S. C. Langford, “Laser ablation studies relevant to thin film deposition,” in Laser and Ion Beam Modification of Materials: Proceedings of the Symposium of the 3rd IUMRS International Conference on Advanced Materials, Sunshine City, Ikebukuro, Tokyo, Japan, August 31-September 4, 1993, Sunshine City, Ikebukuro, Tokyo, Japan, 1994, vol. 17, pp. 283–288.

[10]

J. T. Dickinson, L. C. Jensen, R. L. Webb, and S. C. Langford, “Photoluminescence imaging of mechanically produced defects in MgO,” J. Non-Cryst. Solids, vol. 177, pp. 1–8, Nov. 1994.

[11]

R. L. Webb, “Sensitization of PMMA to excimer laser  ablation at 308 nm wavelength,” presented at the March Meeting of the American Physical Society, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, 23-Mar-1993.

[12]

R. L. Webb, L. C. Jensen, S. C. Langford, and J. T. Dickinson, “Interactions of wide band‐gap single crystals with 248 nm excimer laser radiation. II. NaCl,” J. Appl. Phys., vol. 74, no. 4, pp. 2338–2346, Aug. 1993.

[13]

R. L. Webb, L. C. Jensen, S. C. Langford, and J. T. Dickinson, “Interactions of wide band‐gap single crystals with 248 nm excimer laser radiation. I. MgO,” J. Appl. Phys., vol. 74, no. 4, pp. 2323–2337, Aug. 1993.

[14]

J. T. Dickinson, S. C. Langford, L. C. Jensen, R. L. Webb, and J. ‐J. Shin, “Mechanisms of excimer laser desorption and ablation from wide band-gap materials: the role of defects,” in IEEE Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Annual Meeting, 1993. LEOS ’93 Conference Proceedings, 1993, pp. 766–767.

[15]

J. T. Dickinson, L. C. Jensen, R. L. Webb, and S. C. Langford, “Laser ablation of wide band‐gap materials: The role of defects in single crystal MgO,” in AIP Conference Proceedings, 1993, vol. 288, pp. 13–25.

[16]

J. T. Dickinson, L. C. Jensen, R. L. Webb, M. L. Dawes, and S. C. Langford, “Interactions of wide band gap single crystals with 248 nm excimer laser radiation. III. The role of cleavage‐induced defects in MgO,” J. Appl. Phys., vol. 74, no. 6, pp. 3758–3767, Sep. 1993.

[17]

J. T. Dickinson, L. C. Jensen, R. L. Webb, M. L. Dawes, and S. C. Langford, “Mechanisms of Excimer Laser Ablation of Wide Band-Gap Materials: the Role of Defects in Single Crystal MgO,” Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc., vol. 285, pp. 131–143, 1992.

[18]

R. L. Webb, L. C. Jensen, S. C. Langford, and J. T. Dickinson, “Ablation of Single Crystal MgO by UV Excimer Irradiation,” Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc., vol. 236, pp. 21–26, 1991.

[19]

R. L. Webb, “Transmission of 300-500 nm light through Z-cut Sapphire Shocked Beyond its Elastic Limit,” MS, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, 1990.

 

Personal Information:

 

Richard was born in Corona, Calif., in 1966. At the age of five weeks his mother took him and his older sister to join his father at Yele Mission in Sierra Leone (on the continent of Africa). Richard lived in Sierra Leone and later Liberia until the age of five when the family returned to California. Richard spent his formative years as a "faculty brat" at Monterey Bay Academy where he developed his life-long devotion to God, physics and the Oakland Raiders.

After graduating from Monterey Bay Academy, Richard continued his education at the La Sierra Campus of Loma Linda University where he graduated with a degree in physics. At this time Richard made the decision to expand his horizons and do his graduate study outside of The Great State of California. While studying for his Ph.D. at Washington State University in Pullman, Wash., Richard had the opportunity to spend a summer doing research in Tsukuba, Japan. At the end of his time in graduate school he also spent nine months working at Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories in Richland, Wash.

Immediately upon defending his doctoral degree Richard moved back to his beloved California, teaching physics at Pacific Union College. Although he remains steadfast in claiming California as his home, Richard decided to further expand his horizons by moving to Lincoln, Neb., to teach at Union College in 2003. He is happy that he came to Union College and appreciates the great friends he has made in Nebraska, but each summer he heads "home to California" to visit family and friends.

In May, 2012, Richard married his beautiful wife, Amy Webb, who he met through the workings of his students at Union College.  The two, along with Amy's son Nate, are living happily ever after!

Spouse:

Amy Webb was born and raised in Lincoln, Neb.  She moved away in the late 1980's but returned in 2009 to care for her grandparents.  Amy was hired to be the Office Manager for the Division of Human Development at Union College.  Education students Connie Spader and Aubrey Darrough, who knew Amy from their interactions in the Division of Human Development and Richard from taking his Astronomy course, provided the connection that resulted in the marriage of Richard and Amy.  In addition to her personal charms, Amy brings three daughters, one son, and one (soon to be two) grandson into Richard's life.

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