News Archive

Union College hosts gymnastics showcase

Don't be alarmed if you see youth hoisting each other onto shoulders or walking down a sidewalk on their hands--they are gymnasts, and they will be invading Lincoln Nov. 12-15.

Union College presents Freedom Writers' Erin Gruwell

Erin GruwellErin Gruwell, co-author of The Freedom Writers, will be speaking at 8:30 p.m., Nov. 13, at the Seventh-day Adventist College View Church, 4801 Prescott Ave., Lincoln, Neb.

Union College hosts international educators


Union College students Cori Piel and Matt Evens speak with administrators from other countries at the Phi Delta Kappa dinner.

Students organize memorial to victims of domestic violence

Domestic violence is a war that goes on behind closed doors and causes 2,000 to 4,000 casualties each year in the United States. The American Medical Association states that one in every three women will experience violence from a husband of boyfriend.

IRR students share relief in Texas

On Saturday evening, Sept. 13, students from Union College's international rescue and relief program gathered for a vote. Dr. Michael Duehrssen, associate director of the program, presented the students with two choices: drive through the night to south Texas without specific rescue or relief assignments or wait until morning to hear more from contacts already in the area.

Children of the World performance brings more than culture

Joining voices from around the globe, the Children of the World choir will bring their program to the College View Seventh-day Adventist Church at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 19.

Enrollment Dips, Spirit Climbs

Seeing packed stands cheering at Union's annual dodgeball championship and a sea of volunteers in matching shirts for Project Impact, the college's annual community service event, it might be hard for an observer to believe Union College has fewer students than last fall's 24-year high.

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Union College volunteers serve community: Is it still altruistic if you're having fun?

It's rare to hear college students chat excitedly about weeding, cleaning, painting and sorting, but as groups trickled back to the Union College campus from serving more than 50 sites around Lincoln, Neb., those were the topics on everyone's mind. "We washed windows, scraped gum off tables, dusted book covers ... none of it was anything I'd think to do on my own," said Ashley Herbel, a freshman pre-med student from Wichita, Kansas after spending the morning at South Library. "But going with a group of friends can make anything fun."

With more than 800 participants, there were a lot of friends, new and old, to transform the chores into constructive play. This year's turnout included over 80 percent of the student body along with college employees and volunteers from other local Seventh-day Adventist organizations. While attendance isn't taken for the volunteer event, Rich Carlson, vice president for spiritual life, said Union's Campus Ministries distributed more t-shirts to campus volunteers than in previous years. "I think this is the largest group we've ever had," Carlson said.

Begun in 1981 as Project Brush, the original goal of the day was to paint 100 houses in 10 years. After completing the 113th house, the event was renamed and the projects diversified. Now volunteers focus on serving the agencies that serve others, providing helping hands to do tasks over-stretched social service organizations have a hard time keeping up with.

"It amazes me you can take 10 or 12 people and get done in a few hours what would take me days to do on my own," said Huda McClelland, Union's director of admissions who has witnessed most of the event's 27-year history.

"What we've heard so far from the agencies is overwhelmingly positive," Carlson said. "They're always amazed by the quantity and quality of work our students do and the attitude with which it is done."

Listening to students talk under the campus' clock tower as they shared 220 pizzas, the conversations always returned to the same refrain: the work wasn't only fast, it was fun. Erin Webb, a senior business administration major from Greenville, Tenn., told about finding a creative outlet while painting barrels at Goodwill. Beau Snyder, a senior from Culver, Ore., described cleaning at the Lincoln Children's Museum as, "playing with a pressure hose." Even when Jennifer Dovich, a junior pre-med student from Turner, Ore., mentioned getting paint in her eye while painting a ceiling at Mahoney Elementary School, she added, "It was worth it, it was awesome and so much fun."

Some former students who have experienced the spirit of the community service event returned to share in the labor and the camaraderie again. Thang Nguyen, an alumnus now working in Web development at Nebraska Books, told his boss about the event and she encouraged him to take the day off to participate. "I didn't want to miss the fun," Nguyen said.

Since its inception, Project Impact has been student-led. This year Ann Bryant, a senior business administration major from Woodbury, Tenn., organized the event for the third time and trained a new coordinator, Emily Carlson, a junior elementary education major from Mohrsville, Pa. Both students, with the assistance of Ashley Groeneweg, a biology education major from Omaha, Neb., spent the summer organizing site lists, coordinating with sponsors and ensuring transportation and tools were available. "Hearing the enthusiasm from the organizations makes the months of planning worth it," Bryant said.

Bryant added, "The worst thing that happened today was I didn't have anywhere to send the people who finished and wanted to do more." While the chores for the day may be completed, she hopes the contacts made will serve as a springboard for future service. Past Project Impacts have developed into long-term commitments for both individuals and student organizations, such as the volleyball team, the women's basketball team and the Union Scholars honors program. "One day of raking or painting makes the community slightly nicer," Bryant said. "But creating an environment where service is fun and exciting can have a big impact on the world."

Special thanks goes to Suzie Grey and InsideOut A capella for permission to use their songs. You can find out more about these talented artists on their Web sites:
Suzie Grey
InsideOut A capella



 

Union College invites community to hear Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow

Union College Division of Business and Computer Science welcomes Raichelle "Rai" H. Glover as a Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow Sept. 8-12. Glover, an accomplished executive, motivational speaker, leadership coach and civic volunteer, navigated corporate America as a Christian business woman in her fast-climbing career with Bank of America.

According to Barry Forbes, chair of Union College Division of Business and Computer Science, when funding became available through division's Advisory Board to host a visiting fellow, the group had many intriguing leaders to choose from. The division chose Glover because of her wealth of her experiences and connections between her areas of expertise and Union's learning environment.

"Topics such as 'liberal arts paths to corporate leadership' and 'what corporate diversity means today' are extremely relevant to Union College students," Forbes said. "Rai Glover's experience with work/family balance and strong civic engagement as shown by her many awards exemplify qualities that are important to this generation. We are honored that she accepted our invitation to spend the week with our students."

In her first book release (2007), Corporate to Kindergarten, Rai shares her personal weekly diary of the joys and struggles she faced while being a mom to a kindergartner and managing a thriving corporate career.

While on campus, Glover will be a guest speaker in six classes: Business Communications, Financial Institutions and Markets, Quality Management, Dynamics of Business, Conflict Management, and Nursing Management and Leadership. She will also present for the following free events that are open to the public:

Weekly Campus Chapel
"How to be a Christian in the Business World"
Tuesday, Sept. 9, 10:30 a.m.
College View Seventh-day Adventist Church
4801 Prescott Avenue

Union College Business Awareness Series
"Essential traits of successful leaders"
Wednesday, Sept. 10, 7 p.m.
Everett Dick Administration Building (amphitheatre, lower level)
Located at the center of the Union College campus—3800 S. 48th St.

Academic Convocation
"Benefits of a liberal arts background in becoming a corporate leader"
Thursday, Sept. 11, 10:30 a.m.
Everett Dick Administration Building (amphitheatre, lower level)
Located at the center of the Union College campus--3800 S. 48th St.

For more information about these events, contact Union College Division of Business and Computer Science: 486-2521.

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Project Impact kicks off a year of volunteering

Students always want more of three resources: time, money and sleep. So when Union College students are given a day free of classes and other on-campus commitments, it may seem counter-intuitive that 85 percent choose to show up at 8:15 a.m. to spend the day working--for free. But students make up for what they lack with an excess of enthusiasm and altruism. On Thursday, Sept. 4, Union students will once again commit their time and energy to serving the Lincoln community.

"I think everybody wants to help others," said Sara Baptist, sophomore communication major from Canon City, Colo. "When something presents itself like Project Impact, we jump on it. If Union held it more often, people would still go."

Began in 1981, Project Impact has given students the opportunity to change their corner of the world wile establishing lasting connections within the community. An estimated 15,100 volunteers have impacted Lincoln with more than 99,000 hours of voluntary labor since its inception. According to available research, it's the longest running collegiate service day with the highest percentage of participation in the nation.

There's no brownie points, no extra credit--nothing to motivate the mass of students to join the cause other than satisfaction and a free t-shirt. Whether it's raking leaves, painting shelters, serving up soup or helping build a house, Union College students and faculty turn out to do whatever sweaty, grimy work needs to be accomplished for those in need.

Building on the students' energy and 27 years of success, Ann Bryant, senior business administration major and Project Impact coordinator, sees the event as a way for students to connect with agencies they can serve all year. This will be the fourth year Union's women's basketball team will spend the day helping at the Lincoln Children's Museum, a relationship that has grown as the players return throughout the year to help with events.

"I like volunteering. I feel it's important," Baptist said. "It's not easy for kids to just say 'I'm going to volunteer this weekend.'" Students like Baptist can find ways to do more by talking to Union's student volunteer coordinator, Kaylea Blackburn, sophomore international rescue and relief major from Summersville, Mo., or read about a different volunteer opportunity highlighted each week in the Clocktower, Union's student newspaper.

Bryant, now in her third year of planning Project Impact, sees this year's event as a learning experience for her peers. "Of all the pressures you would think could keep students from volunteering--homework, class, extracurricular activities, the price of gas, whatever--the biggest barrier is awareness," Bryant said. "I've learned that the more people I involve in the planning process of this event, the more people understand the purpose of Project Impact and then are able to take on that passion themselves."

"Margins" doodle art exhibit begins July 24, 2008

During a lecture, presentation or meeting, hands often have a mind of their own. Surrealist artists called the shapes that fill notebooks and scrap paper "automatic drawing." Most people just call them "doodles." From July 24 to Aug. 17, 2008, the McClelland Art Gallery will host "Margins," an exhibition of art created while the mind is otherwise occupied.

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Union's IRR Program profiled in Journal Star

The International Rescue and Relief major offered at Union College has been profiled in the Lincoln Journal Star (June 17, 2008). Download the story as a PDF.

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Financial aid changes make planning for college easier

Alan Orrison, student financial advisor, helps student Dan Martinez navigate the terms of the Gates Millennium Scholarship that brought him to Union.

It's been a long time since Union College cost $15 per month, 117 years to be precise. Since then, costs at private colleges nationwide have risen to an average of $23,712 for tuition and fees during 2007-2008, not including room and board. Likewise, the benefits of a bachelor's degree have increased to an expected $800,000 more earned income over a lifetime than someone with a high school diploma.1

Though Union's costs are 32 percent under the national average for private colleges, students and families often need help financing a Christian education. After a year of research and consultation with experts and comparable colleges, Union is launching a new, streamlined financial aid policy.

"Our goal has always been to provide an affordable Christian education," said Rob Weaver, vice president for Enrollment and Student Financial Services. "We've kept tuition down largely through the help of our alumni and mission-oriented faculty and staff, but we've been asking ourselves for a while now if we are using our financial aid budget to maximize the benefit it gives students. With the new policy, I think we can answer 'yes.'"

The previous financial aid system loaded almost all of the benefits onto the first two years, and while still front-loaded, the new policy includes a renewable component that guarantees more money than before for up to three additional years. "Families will be better able to plan for all four years, and the greater renewable funds will make it easier for juniors and seniors to continue at Union," Weaver said. "We hope this will improve Union's retention rate."

While grades and test scores have previously played an important role, much of a student's award was based high school achievements, such as holding leadership positions, being involved in their church and many other variables.

Taryn Rouse, Doretha Dale, Alan Orrison and Elina Camarena comprise Union's Student Financial Services team. "Elina and the financial advisors work long hours and weekends when necessary, even taking calls at home," Rob Weaver said. "Their dedication makes financial issues easier for families to deal with."

"A system that encourages leadership and involvement sounds like a good idea until you try to implement it," said Camarena, director of Student Financial Services. "We couldn't verify anything, and it favored the outgoing over the shy. With so many variables, it's no wonder we always had long lines at registration.

According to Taryn Rouse, student financial advisor, the worst-case scenario under the old system was a student who came unprepared. "If someone couldn't remember or just couldn't articulate what they'd achieved, they'd leave with zero financial aid unless their parents stepped in and did the speaking for them," she said. "Under the new system, the questions are really simple: What was your cumulative GPA? What was your ACT or SAT score? Have you filled out a FAFSA?"2

If a student's answers to the first two questions are 3.5 GPA, an ACT score of 30 (SAT of 1980), then they qualify for the highest level of merit awards, $25,000 over a four-year period, and possibly more if their FAFSA indicates high financial need.

Though the focus remains on academic merit and financial need, those with the most to gain from the new policy are average students from middle class families. In the past, a student with average or low grades and test scores, no leadership experience and a family income too high for government grants received little to no financial aid. Now everyone who fills out a FAFSA gets at least $3,000 for the first year, renewable at $1,500 per year for the three years.

"We really have to thank our donors for providing so much help to our students through unspecified donations, gifts to the Union College Fund and named scholarships," said Stephanie Meyer, scholarships and events director. "Without their commitment, we could never approach this level of financial assistance.

It's important to remember also that what a student qualifies for in direct aid from Union under this policy might not be the only help they receive. Some additional sources of funding will continue to include:

Matching church donations. "It says a lot about a student when a church family steps forward to help in their education," Weaver said. "Union will continue to match donations from churches of up to $3,300 at a rate of 50 percent."

Scholarships for missions and service. Union will continue to reward students for participation in mission and volunteer service, summer camp work, literature evangelism and other activities that further the mission of the world church.

Top test scores. National Merit Award Scholars and those with equivalent ACT scores qualify for 100 percent of tuition. "There are some students every college wants because of their academic excellence," Weaver said. "We are proud of our history of attracting top students to Union, and we'll continue to offer them scholarships at a competitive level." Foundation and corporate scholarships. "I encourage all students to apply for outside scholarships," Rouse said. "Just because Union can't provide more help doesn't mean no one can, and putting a little effort into applying can really pay off." Foundation and corporate scholarships. "I encourage all students to apply for outside scholarships," Rouse said. "Just because Union can't provide more help doesn't mean no one can, and putting a little effort into applying can really pay off."

Grace from the Union College Fund. "Every year I see students who face extraordinary circumstances and don't know how they will continue their education," said David Smith, college president. "Sometimes just a little extra support from our alumni can make a huge difference in a student's life. The Union College Fund provides for some discretionary aid each year."

While taking the guesswork out of financial aid may make the new system seem less magical to students, God's hand is still evident in funding Union College educations. "It sounds corny, but we do see miracles happen all the time," Rouse said. "Really, it can be frustrating sometimes when I've seen a miracle and can't tell everyone because of privacy concerns."

"Seeing everything fall into place makes our jobs rewarding," Camarena added. "We've seen people come in who think they can't afford anything and leave with a plan that meets their needs."

"I want everyone in Mid-America to know that if attending Union has ever crossed their minds, but they didn't think they could afford it, they should call us, write us, e-mail us or just come visit," Camarena said. "You never know what's possible."

1 Statistics gathered by the College Board.
 2 Free Application for Federal Student Aid.

Union College graduation marks alumni milestone

Tara Taylor and Zak Adams
Tara Taylor and Zak Adams in graduation regalia during Parents Weekend 2007.

Fortenberry speaks at Union College Physician Assistant Hooding Ceremony

Congressman Jeff Fortenberry delivered the keynote address as the Physician Assistant Program of Union College's Division of Health Sciences began a new tradition: graduate hooding. This is the second year since the program finished transitioning from offering a baccalaureate degree to conferring a Master of Physician Assistant Studies and the first year it has held a hooding ceremony.

The ceremony took place on Friday, May 9, in the Ridnour Room of The Apothecary in Lincoln's Haymarket from 4:30 to 7 p.m.

"We are glad Congressman Fortenberry agreed to deliver the keynote," said Jeff Joiner, chair of the Division of Health Sciences. "Health care and politics are increasingly intertwined, and professionals and policy makers should take every opportunity to understand each other."

During the ceremony, established members of the profession gave the 22 students hoods to be worn as part of their regalia. "Hooding is a common tradition in health science graduate programs," said Joiner. "It's a great opportunity for us to say 'goodbye' to our students and welcome them as colleagues."

"Colleagues" is a particularly apt term for this class. According to Mike Huckabee, physician assistant program director, a higher number of students have firm offers of post-graduation employment than ever before.

"We're seeing unprecedented demand for our graduates," said Huckabee. It's no wonder, considering the physician assistant profession was rated in the April issue of Money Magazine as number five of the top ten best careers during an economic downturn.

The hooding also celebrated the end of the program's ninth year of existence and marked the beginning of a decade of service. "We have a lot to be thankful for this year," Huckabee said. "We're particularly grateful for grants from the Nebraska Academy of Physician Assistants and the National Physician Assistant Foundation that have allowed Union's PA and nursing programs to continue providing free foot care to the homeless of Lincoln."

Awdish presents "a bit of the unusual" in senior display at McClelland Art Gallery

Running from April 27 through May 3, 2008 a new senior exhibit will be shown at the McClelland Art Gallery. Artist Katee Awdish, senior graphic design and English major, has been drawing since a young age.

"Through my art, I like learning about myself, and I figure out what in life really brings me joy," Adwish said. "When I'm creating a new painting with a new character, I think about what his story might be. I figure out details in his clothing and the colors and personality he is. I learn a lot about myself from what I notice in the world."

Her display contains 15-20 items including fine art, ink, watercolor, topography posters and photography.

"People should come see it if they like color," she explained, "or if they like kind of a bit of the unusual, because a lot of my art has a fantasy touch. The media, anime, cartoons and books I'm reading tend to inspire my art."

The McClelland Art Gallery is in the Ortner Center on the Union College campus, 3800 S. 48th Street. Enter the campus from Prescott Avenue. The art gallery is free to the public and open daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, contact the Ortner Center at 402.486.2545.

Warriors banquet honors athletes

More than 75 Union College students, employees and guests attended the first annual Sports Awards Dinner on Sunday, April 20, 2008. Emceed by Brendan Nieto, senior business administration major, and Ross Eichele, senior business administration and computer information systems major, the evening included a catered dinner, an inspirational talk by former Warrior Aaron Purkeypile and a presentation of awards.

"This is the first year we've had an end-of-year event that recognized achievements by all those who participate in sports at Union," said Greg Steiner, intramurals director and women's basketball head coach. "In the past, the varsity athletes have celebrated with a dinner, but we felt it was important to hold a more inclusive event. Next year we hope to widen the circle more to include athletic achievements in sports offered for academic credit, such as gymnastics."

The event was sponsored by the Warriors Booster Club and planned by Heather Perry, senior business administration major. To learn more about the Warriors, join the booster club and see results from this year, visit www.ucollege.edu/athletics.

Intramural Awards

Intramural Sportsman:

Daniel Cress

Intramural Sportswoman:

Chelsea Flemmer

All Sports Team:

Daniel Cress,
Kyle Rickard,
Kyle Glass,
Ross Eichele,
Seth Flemmer,
Chelsea Flemmer,
Jared Henry

Officiating

NIRSA level two official:

Andy Ransone

Women's Volleyball

Offensive player of the year:

Baylee Underwood

Defensive player of the year:

Stephanie Krueger

Men's Baskteball

Offensive player of the year:

Travis Kierstead

Defensive player of the year:

Chase Tikker

Women's basketball awards

Offensive player of the year:

Beth-Anne Lapse

Defensive player of the year:

Julia Short

Golf Awards

Best game:

Phil Thompson

Best average:

Phil Thompson

Academic Awards

Men:

Travis Kierstead

Women:

Staci Davenport

First Book-Union College gives children 7,000 brand new books

Joann Herrington, associate professor of education, strives to spread literacy and happiness to disadvantaged children in the local area.

"Reading has always been a part of my life," she said, "and I want that for the kids."

In 2003, Herrington organized the Lincoln chapter of First Book, an international nonprofit organization that gives new books to low-income families. Since then over 7,000 books have been placed into the hands of kids in Lincoln thanks to efforts of First Book-Union College, whose staff fluctuates each year as interested students come and go. This year, Chris Webb, senior communication major, is helping the cause by incorporating First Book needs into his Grant Writing and Proposal class. It's efforts such as these that allow First Book-Union College to flourish.

First Book deals only in new books that are given to children to keep, so that their love for literature can grow. Over the holiday season, the chain-bookstore Borders teamed up with First-Book to raise over $1.1 million. That money was then allotted to the various chapters and advisory boards around the nation who submitted grant applications. Recently, First Book-Union College was able to provide $4,000 in Borders gift cards to three recipients in Lincoln: St. Mary's Elementary, Lincoln Public Schools' Excite Head Start and Brownell Community Learning Center. Another 176 books were given to the Foster Grandparent and RSVP (Retired & Senior Volunteer Program) reading programs in Chardon, Neb. The Union College chapter, the only First Book program in Lincoln, Neb., has also been making its own partnerships with Meadowlark Press and with Union College's Associate Student Body. The proceeds from the last Bachelor Action held by ASB went towards First Book-Union College's goal.

"I'm very thrilled about how many books are in children's hands," Herrington said. "What I would really like to see, as far as First Book-Union College, is more people getting involved. If we can raise more funds that means more books can go out into the community."

To get involved, contact Joann Herrington at 402.486.2600 x2173 or send an e-mail to joherrin@ucollege.edu.

Senior art exhibit brought to you by the letter "C"

Do you ever wonder who makes the hanging works of art, which masquerade as posters? With the creations of Claudia Pech, senior communication and graphic design major, wonder no more. Her quirky signature "Brought to you by the letter C" line clears up any confusion in a fun way and is now the title for her senior graphic design exhibit in the McClelland Art Gallery.

Running until April 26, the display of 25 pieces showcases Pech's talent at mixing creativity and information into true works of art. One of her favorite items is a poster advertising for Union College's annual film festival.

"It was a rather complex idea that actually turned out the way I wanted it. People still ask me, 'how did you do that?'" said Pech. Although to some her work may seem boring, Pech explained how intricate a process it can be and as well as the room for artistry.

"It's a different type of art," she said. "It's non-traditional. You find that you can use your imagination in a way that you hadn't thought of before."

The McClelland Art Gallery is in the Ortner Center on the Union College campus, 3800 S. 48th Street. Enter the campus from Prescott Avenue. The art gallery is free to the public and open daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, contact the Ortner Center at 402.486.2545.

Union artists on display at O'Keefe Gallery in Omaha

Pottery by Jovannah Poor Bear

Pottery by Jovannah Poor Bear won honorable mention at the annual NICF art show in Omaha.

Community invited as students end the year with music

As the academic year winds down, students often feel like singing. At Union, the months of April and May are filled with music as students showcase a year's worth of practice and learning.

All events are free and the community is invited to attend. Performances take place in the Engel Recital Hall (in Engel Hall on the corner of Bancroft Ave. and south 48th St.) unless otherwise noted.

Esther Baierl Senior Voice Recital
Sunday, April 13, 3:00 p.m.

Unionaires Spring Vespers Concert
Friday, April 18, 8:00 p.m.
College View Church

Concert Winds Spring Concert
Saturday, April 19, 8:45 p.m.
Union College Gymnasium

UC Chamber Orchestra Spring Concert
Sunday, April 20, 6:00 p.m.

Seth Dunkin Senior Recital
Sunday, April 27, 3:00 p.m.

General Student Recital
Tuesday, April 29 7:30 p.m.

Honors Piano Recital
Wednesday, April 30 7:30 p.m.

Unionaires "Concert at the Capitol"
Thursday, May 8, noon-1:00 p.m.
Nebraska State Capitol Rotunda

Naomi Bruette Junior Recital
Thursday, May 8, 7:00 p.m.
College View Church

Jordan Lang Senior Piano Recital
Thursday, May 8, 8:00 p.m.
College View Church

Erin Flanagan Senior Voice Recital
Saturday, May 10, 8:00 p.m.

Senior art exhibit "Under Construction" in McClelland Art Gallery

Until April 20, The McClelland Art Gallery windows are laced with yellow tape, touting CAUTION and CUDIDO in bold, black lettering. Yet the current display by Union College's Zak Adams, a senior graphic design major, is open and safe to the public for viewing.

Titled Under Construction, a sign just inside the door explains that, as a person, Adams is ever learning and hence continuously under construction. The theme also reflects one of his greatest passions, carpentry.

McClelland exhibits wildlife paintings

The paintings of Jim McClelland are on display in the Union College gallery that shares his name March 23-April 12, 2008. The watercolor and oil paintings on display in the McClelland Art Gallery depict a variety of wildlife with an emphasis on birds ranging from cranes to peacocks.

"Artwork is meant to be shared," says McClelland, professor of art at Union College. "I hope people will be inspired by the creative genius of God, expressed not only in the paintings themselves, but in the talents He gives people."

He has displayed his work across the United States and even taught art workshops in seven other countries. McClelland has won numerous "Best of Show" awards and his paintings have been used as illustrations in four books including Hummingbirds of North America, by Dr. Paul Johnsgard.

The McClelland Art Gallery is in the Ortner Center on the Union College campus, 3800 S. 48th Street. Enter the campus from Prescott Avenue. The art gallery is free to the public and open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more information, contact the Ortner Center at 402.486.2545.

Union College hosts leadership seminar simulcast April 18

On Friday, April 18, the Maximum Impact Simulcast: Advance will include over 80,000 business professionals participating via satellite downlink in 600 churches across North America. Union College and the College View Seventh-day Adventist Church, located at 4801 Prescott Ave., are participating as a joint host site for this unprecedented leadership event, which is anticipated to be the largest leadership seminar in 2008. This live seminar, broadcast from Atlanta, Ga., has trained over 250,000 business professionals in the last six years

"We feel that it is very important for both our students and Lincoln's broader community of faith to develop strong leadership principles with a Christian perspective," said Barry Forbes, chair of Union College's Division of Business and Computer Science. "We invite the community to join our campus for this uplifting and informative session with experts from the business world."

Tickets for the full day seminar are available to the public for $59 before April 1, $69 from April 1-17, $79 after April 18. Students not from Union with a valid student ID may attend for $39. Union College students are offered the subsidized rate of $10 while Union employees pay only $20. To order tickets or for more information call Union College at 402.486.2973 or visit www.maximumimpact.com/mis to learn more about the event. The schedule for the Lincoln site of the April 18 event is as follows: registration from 7 to 7:45 a.m., program begins at 8 a.m., lunch (on your own) from 11 a.m. to noon and program ends at 3 p.m.

Last year's Maximum Impact Simulcast, held on Friday, May 11, 2007, was one of the largest gatherings of business leaders ever. After such great success, best-selling author and authority on leadership Dr. John C. Maxwell will once again be joined on stage by legendary leaders including New York Times Bestselling Author Patrick Lencioni; Fast Company Founding Editor Bill Taylor; Former Nike Creative Katalyst Kevin Carroll, Authors Andy Stanley and Andy Andrews, and ESPN Analyst Dick Vitale. The event will be hosted by CBS Sports Analyst Spencer Tillman and action planning will be provided by executive coach Valorie Burton.

"The Maximum Impact Simulcast is about helping people advance," said Jeremie Kubicek, CEO/President of Atlanta-based GiANT Impact, owner of Maximum Impact. "When you leave MIS you will be better equipped as a leader to connect with your team in a manner that fosters growth and builds strong relationships." The business model for the MI Simulcast consists of partnering with churches to bring relevant business and leadership training to workplace leaders in their local community.

Simulcast founder Dr. John C. Maxwell is the author of such best-selling books as The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership and The 17 Indisputable Laws of Teamwork. He also is the founder of Maximum Impact and INJOY, organizations dedicated to providing resources and training for personal and professional growth. Every year he speaks to Fortune 500 companies, international government leaders, and organizations as diverse as the United States Military Academy at West Point, Chick-fil-A, Wal-Mart, the National Football League, Mary Kay, and the Indianapolis 500 Drivers.

The MI Simulcast: Advance will focus on helping each participant in attendance advance at work, in life and as individuals. Each speaker will illuminate certain qualities akin to their personal careers and experience and provide in-depth perspective on how to unleash the influential leadership power in yourself and those around you. Continuing education credit is also available for attending the simulcast.

2008 Maximum Impact Simulcast: Advance

Speaker Bios

John C. Maxwell - John C. Maxwell is an internationally recognized leadership expert, speaker and author who has sold over 13 million books. Every year he speaks to Fortune 500 companies, international government leaders, and organizations from the United States Military Academy to the National Football League. Maxwell has three books that have sold over one million copies, including Developing the Leader Within You.

Bill Taylor - Bill Taylor is an adjunct professor at Babson College, American's top-rated school for entrepreneurship, where he created the "Maverick Seminar at Babson College." Taylor is the co-author of three books and has a new column in the London newspaper The Guardian called "Bill Taylor on Big Ideas."

Kevin Carroll - Kevin Carroll is the author of the highly successful Rules of the Red Rubber Ball and founder of Katalyst Consultancy. After a stint in the Air Force, Carroll became the head athletic trainer for the Philadelphia 76ers before moving to Nike to help the company gain a deeper of understanding of athletic product performance and team dynamics. He was the inspiration for the Lance Armstrong wristband phenomenon.

Patrick Lencioni - Patrick Lencioni is the author of six best-selling books including Five Dysfunctions of a Team and The Three Signs of a Miserable Job. Lencioni is the founder and president of The Table Group, a firm dedicated to providing organizations with ideas, products and services that improve teamwork, clarity and effectiveness.

Spencer Tillman - As an All-American running back for the Oklahoma Sooners, Spencer Tillman was fifth in the Heisman trophy voting in 1983 and captain of the 1985 national championship team. He played in the NFL until 1994 for the Houston Oilers and San Francisco 49ers. Tillman is the studio analyst for College Football Today on CBS and the host of DirecTV's Sunday NFL Ticket.

Andy Stanley - Recognized as a top influential leader for pastors, Andy Stanley is senior pastor of North Point Ministries, one of the faster growing ministries in North America. With campuses in Georgia, more than 20,000 congregants visit his churches each week. Stanley is a best-selling author of many books including The Next Generation Leader and 7 Practices of Effective Ministry.

Dick Vitale - Dick Vitale, one of college basketball's top analysts and ambassadors, joined ESPN during the 1979-1980 season following a successful college and pro coaching careers. Vitale is also a college basketball analyst for ESPN Radio and Sportscenter and writer for ESPN.com and USA Today. In 1983 Vitale was named one of the sport's five most influential personalities and in 1989 recognized as the Sportscasters Association "Sports Personality of the Year."

Andy Andrews - Andy Andrews is an internationally-known speaker and novelist whose combined works, including The Travler's Gift: Seven Decisions that Determine Personal Success, have sold millions of copies worldwide. He has been a guest speaker at the White House at the request of four presidents.

Valerie Burton - A sought after life coach and speaker, Valerie Burton is the author many books including Listen to Your Life and What's Really Holding You Back. Burton is a professional certified coach whose segment on the nationally syndicated radio show "Sharing Life Together" airs on 80 stations nationwide. From 2001-2003, Burton served on the Texas Governor's Commission for Women. She is a former Miss Black Texas, Miss Black USA finalist and runner-up Miss Texas.

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