News Archive

"Margins" doodle art exhibit begins July 24, 2008

During a lecture, presentation or meeting, hands often have a mind of their own. Surrealist artists called the shapes that fill notebooks and scrap paper "automatic drawing." Most people just call them "doodles." From July 24 to Aug. 17, 2008, the McClelland Art Gallery will host "Margins," an exhibition of art created while the mind is otherwise occupied.

Tags: 

Union's IRR Program profiled in Journal Star

The International Rescue and Relief major offered at Union College has been profiled in the Lincoln Journal Star (June 17, 2008). Download the story as a PDF.

Tags: 

Financial aid changes make planning for college easier

Alan Orrison, student financial advisor, helps student Dan Martinez navigate the terms of the Gates Millennium Scholarship that brought him to Union.

It's been a long time since Union College cost $15 per month, 117 years to be precise. Since then, costs at private colleges nationwide have risen to an average of $23,712 for tuition and fees during 2007-2008, not including room and board. Likewise, the benefits of a bachelor's degree have increased to an expected $800,000 more earned income over a lifetime than someone with a high school diploma.1

Though Union's costs are 32 percent under the national average for private colleges, students and families often need help financing a Christian education. After a year of research and consultation with experts and comparable colleges, Union is launching a new, streamlined financial aid policy.

"Our goal has always been to provide an affordable Christian education," said Rob Weaver, vice president for Enrollment and Student Financial Services. "We've kept tuition down largely through the help of our alumni and mission-oriented faculty and staff, but we've been asking ourselves for a while now if we are using our financial aid budget to maximize the benefit it gives students. With the new policy, I think we can answer 'yes.'"

The previous financial aid system loaded almost all of the benefits onto the first two years, and while still front-loaded, the new policy includes a renewable component that guarantees more money than before for up to three additional years. "Families will be better able to plan for all four years, and the greater renewable funds will make it easier for juniors and seniors to continue at Union," Weaver said. "We hope this will improve Union's retention rate."

While grades and test scores have previously played an important role, much of a student's award was based high school achievements, such as holding leadership positions, being involved in their church and many other variables.

Taryn Rouse, Doretha Dale, Alan Orrison and Elina Camarena comprise Union's Student Financial Services team. "Elina and the financial advisors work long hours and weekends when necessary, even taking calls at home," Rob Weaver said. "Their dedication makes financial issues easier for families to deal with."

"A system that encourages leadership and involvement sounds like a good idea until you try to implement it," said Camarena, director of Student Financial Services. "We couldn't verify anything, and it favored the outgoing over the shy. With so many variables, it's no wonder we always had long lines at registration.

According to Taryn Rouse, student financial advisor, the worst-case scenario under the old system was a student who came unprepared. "If someone couldn't remember or just couldn't articulate what they'd achieved, they'd leave with zero financial aid unless their parents stepped in and did the speaking for them," she said. "Under the new system, the questions are really simple: What was your cumulative GPA? What was your ACT or SAT score? Have you filled out a FAFSA?"2

If a student's answers to the first two questions are 3.5 GPA, an ACT score of 30 (SAT of 1980), then they qualify for the highest level of merit awards, $25,000 over a four-year period, and possibly more if their FAFSA indicates high financial need.

Though the focus remains on academic merit and financial need, those with the most to gain from the new policy are average students from middle class families. In the past, a student with average or low grades and test scores, no leadership experience and a family income too high for government grants received little to no financial aid. Now everyone who fills out a FAFSA gets at least $3,000 for the first year, renewable at $1,500 per year for the three years.

"We really have to thank our donors for providing so much help to our students through unspecified donations, gifts to the Union College Fund and named scholarships," said Stephanie Meyer, scholarships and events director. "Without their commitment, we could never approach this level of financial assistance.

It's important to remember also that what a student qualifies for in direct aid from Union under this policy might not be the only help they receive. Some additional sources of funding will continue to include:

Matching church donations. "It says a lot about a student when a church family steps forward to help in their education," Weaver said. "Union will continue to match donations from churches of up to $3,300 at a rate of 50 percent."

Scholarships for missions and service. Union will continue to reward students for participation in mission and volunteer service, summer camp work, literature evangelism and other activities that further the mission of the world church.

Top test scores. National Merit Award Scholars and those with equivalent ACT scores qualify for 100 percent of tuition. "There are some students every college wants because of their academic excellence," Weaver said. "We are proud of our history of attracting top students to Union, and we'll continue to offer them scholarships at a competitive level." Foundation and corporate scholarships. "I encourage all students to apply for outside scholarships," Rouse said. "Just because Union can't provide more help doesn't mean no one can, and putting a little effort into applying can really pay off." Foundation and corporate scholarships. "I encourage all students to apply for outside scholarships," Rouse said. "Just because Union can't provide more help doesn't mean no one can, and putting a little effort into applying can really pay off."

Grace from the Union College Fund. "Every year I see students who face extraordinary circumstances and don't know how they will continue their education," said David Smith, college president. "Sometimes just a little extra support from our alumni can make a huge difference in a student's life. The Union College Fund provides for some discretionary aid each year."

While taking the guesswork out of financial aid may make the new system seem less magical to students, God's hand is still evident in funding Union College educations. "It sounds corny, but we do see miracles happen all the time," Rouse said. "Really, it can be frustrating sometimes when I've seen a miracle and can't tell everyone because of privacy concerns."

"Seeing everything fall into place makes our jobs rewarding," Camarena added. "We've seen people come in who think they can't afford anything and leave with a plan that meets their needs."

"I want everyone in Mid-America to know that if attending Union has ever crossed their minds, but they didn't think they could afford it, they should call us, write us, e-mail us or just come visit," Camarena said. "You never know what's possible."

1 Statistics gathered by the College Board.
 2 Free Application for Federal Student Aid.

Union College graduation marks alumni milestone

Tara Taylor and Zak Adams
Tara Taylor and Zak Adams in graduation regalia during Parents Weekend 2007.

Fortenberry speaks at Union College Physician Assistant Hooding Ceremony

Congressman Jeff Fortenberry delivered the keynote address as the Physician Assistant Program of Union College's Division of Health Sciences began a new tradition: graduate hooding. This is the second year since the program finished transitioning from offering a baccalaureate degree to conferring a Master of Physician Assistant Studies and the first year it has held a hooding ceremony.

The ceremony took place on Friday, May 9, in the Ridnour Room of The Apothecary in Lincoln's Haymarket from 4:30 to 7 p.m.

"We are glad Congressman Fortenberry agreed to deliver the keynote," said Jeff Joiner, chair of the Division of Health Sciences. "Health care and politics are increasingly intertwined, and professionals and policy makers should take every opportunity to understand each other."

During the ceremony, established members of the profession gave the 22 students hoods to be worn as part of their regalia. "Hooding is a common tradition in health science graduate programs," said Joiner. "It's a great opportunity for us to say 'goodbye' to our students and welcome them as colleagues."

"Colleagues" is a particularly apt term for this class. According to Mike Huckabee, physician assistant program director, a higher number of students have firm offers of post-graduation employment than ever before.

"We're seeing unprecedented demand for our graduates," said Huckabee. It's no wonder, considering the physician assistant profession was rated in the April issue of Money Magazine as number five of the top ten best careers during an economic downturn.

The hooding also celebrated the end of the program's ninth year of existence and marked the beginning of a decade of service. "We have a lot to be thankful for this year," Huckabee said. "We're particularly grateful for grants from the Nebraska Academy of Physician Assistants and the National Physician Assistant Foundation that have allowed Union's PA and nursing programs to continue providing free foot care to the homeless of Lincoln."

Awdish presents "a bit of the unusual" in senior display at McClelland Art Gallery

Running from April 27 through May 3, 2008 a new senior exhibit will be shown at the McClelland Art Gallery. Artist Katee Awdish, senior graphic design and English major, has been drawing since a young age.

"Through my art, I like learning about myself, and I figure out what in life really brings me joy," Adwish said. "When I'm creating a new painting with a new character, I think about what his story might be. I figure out details in his clothing and the colors and personality he is. I learn a lot about myself from what I notice in the world."

Her display contains 15-20 items including fine art, ink, watercolor, topography posters and photography.

"People should come see it if they like color," she explained, "or if they like kind of a bit of the unusual, because a lot of my art has a fantasy touch. The media, anime, cartoons and books I'm reading tend to inspire my art."

The McClelland Art Gallery is in the Ortner Center on the Union College campus, 3800 S. 48th Street. Enter the campus from Prescott Avenue. The art gallery is free to the public and open daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, contact the Ortner Center at 402.486.2545.

Warriors banquet honors athletes

More than 75 Union College students, employees and guests attended the first annual Sports Awards Dinner on Sunday, April 20, 2008. Emceed by Brendan Nieto, senior business administration major, and Ross Eichele, senior business administration and computer information systems major, the evening included a catered dinner, an inspirational talk by former Warrior Aaron Purkeypile and a presentation of awards.

"This is the first year we've had an end-of-year event that recognized achievements by all those who participate in sports at Union," said Greg Steiner, intramurals director and women's basketball head coach. "In the past, the varsity athletes have celebrated with a dinner, but we felt it was important to hold a more inclusive event. Next year we hope to widen the circle more to include athletic achievements in sports offered for academic credit, such as gymnastics."

The event was sponsored by the Warriors Booster Club and planned by Heather Perry, senior business administration major. To learn more about the Warriors, join the booster club and see results from this year, visit www.ucollege.edu/athletics.

Intramural Awards

Intramural Sportsman:

Daniel Cress

Intramural Sportswoman:

Chelsea Flemmer

All Sports Team:

Daniel Cress,
Kyle Rickard,
Kyle Glass,
Ross Eichele,
Seth Flemmer,
Chelsea Flemmer,
Jared Henry

Officiating

NIRSA level two official:

Andy Ransone

Women's Volleyball

Offensive player of the year:

Baylee Underwood

Defensive player of the year:

Stephanie Krueger

Men's Baskteball

Offensive player of the year:

Travis Kierstead

Defensive player of the year:

Chase Tikker

Women's basketball awards

Offensive player of the year:

Beth-Anne Lapse

Defensive player of the year:

Julia Short

Golf Awards

Best game:

Phil Thompson

Best average:

Phil Thompson

Academic Awards

Men:

Travis Kierstead

Women:

Staci Davenport

First Book-Union College gives children 7,000 brand new books

Joann Herrington, associate professor of education, strives to spread literacy and happiness to disadvantaged children in the local area.

"Reading has always been a part of my life," she said, "and I want that for the kids."

In 2003, Herrington organized the Lincoln chapter of First Book, an international nonprofit organization that gives new books to low-income families. Since then over 7,000 books have been placed into the hands of kids in Lincoln thanks to efforts of First Book-Union College, whose staff fluctuates each year as interested students come and go. This year, Chris Webb, senior communication major, is helping the cause by incorporating First Book needs into his Grant Writing and Proposal class. It's efforts such as these that allow First Book-Union College to flourish.

First Book deals only in new books that are given to children to keep, so that their love for literature can grow. Over the holiday season, the chain-bookstore Borders teamed up with First-Book to raise over $1.1 million. That money was then allotted to the various chapters and advisory boards around the nation who submitted grant applications. Recently, First Book-Union College was able to provide $4,000 in Borders gift cards to three recipients in Lincoln: St. Mary's Elementary, Lincoln Public Schools' Excite Head Start and Brownell Community Learning Center. Another 176 books were given to the Foster Grandparent and RSVP (Retired & Senior Volunteer Program) reading programs in Chardon, Neb. The Union College chapter, the only First Book program in Lincoln, Neb., has also been making its own partnerships with Meadowlark Press and with Union College's Associate Student Body. The proceeds from the last Bachelor Action held by ASB went towards First Book-Union College's goal.

"I'm very thrilled about how many books are in children's hands," Herrington said. "What I would really like to see, as far as First Book-Union College, is more people getting involved. If we can raise more funds that means more books can go out into the community."

To get involved, contact Joann Herrington at 402.486.2600 x2173 or send an e-mail to joherrin@ucollege.edu.

Senior art exhibit brought to you by the letter "C"

Do you ever wonder who makes the hanging works of art, which masquerade as posters? With the creations of Claudia Pech, senior communication and graphic design major, wonder no more. Her quirky signature "Brought to you by the letter C" line clears up any confusion in a fun way and is now the title for her senior graphic design exhibit in the McClelland Art Gallery.

Running until April 26, the display of 25 pieces showcases Pech's talent at mixing creativity and information into true works of art. One of her favorite items is a poster advertising for Union College's annual film festival.

"It was a rather complex idea that actually turned out the way I wanted it. People still ask me, 'how did you do that?'" said Pech. Although to some her work may seem boring, Pech explained how intricate a process it can be and as well as the room for artistry.

"It's a different type of art," she said. "It's non-traditional. You find that you can use your imagination in a way that you hadn't thought of before."

The McClelland Art Gallery is in the Ortner Center on the Union College campus, 3800 S. 48th Street. Enter the campus from Prescott Avenue. The art gallery is free to the public and open daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, contact the Ortner Center at 402.486.2545.

Union artists on display at O'Keefe Gallery in Omaha

Pottery by Jovannah Poor Bear

Pottery by Jovannah Poor Bear won honorable mention at the annual NICF art show in Omaha.

Community invited as students end the year with music

As the academic year winds down, students often feel like singing. At Union, the months of April and May are filled with music as students showcase a year's worth of practice and learning.

All events are free and the community is invited to attend. Performances take place in the Engel Recital Hall (in Engel Hall on the corner of Bancroft Ave. and south 48th St.) unless otherwise noted.

Esther Baierl Senior Voice Recital
Sunday, April 13, 3:00 p.m.

Unionaires Spring Vespers Concert
Friday, April 18, 8:00 p.m.
College View Church

Concert Winds Spring Concert
Saturday, April 19, 8:45 p.m.
Union College Gymnasium

UC Chamber Orchestra Spring Concert
Sunday, April 20, 6:00 p.m.

Seth Dunkin Senior Recital
Sunday, April 27, 3:00 p.m.

General Student Recital
Tuesday, April 29 7:30 p.m.

Honors Piano Recital
Wednesday, April 30 7:30 p.m.

Unionaires "Concert at the Capitol"
Thursday, May 8, noon-1:00 p.m.
Nebraska State Capitol Rotunda

Naomi Bruette Junior Recital
Thursday, May 8, 7:00 p.m.
College View Church

Jordan Lang Senior Piano Recital
Thursday, May 8, 8:00 p.m.
College View Church

Erin Flanagan Senior Voice Recital
Saturday, May 10, 8:00 p.m.

Senior art exhibit "Under Construction" in McClelland Art Gallery

Until April 20, The McClelland Art Gallery windows are laced with yellow tape, touting CAUTION and CUDIDO in bold, black lettering. Yet the current display by Union College's Zak Adams, a senior graphic design major, is open and safe to the public for viewing.

Titled Under Construction, a sign just inside the door explains that, as a person, Adams is ever learning and hence continuously under construction. The theme also reflects one of his greatest passions, carpentry.

McClelland exhibits wildlife paintings

The paintings of Jim McClelland are on display in the Union College gallery that shares his name March 23-April 12, 2008. The watercolor and oil paintings on display in the McClelland Art Gallery depict a variety of wildlife with an emphasis on birds ranging from cranes to peacocks.

"Artwork is meant to be shared," says McClelland, professor of art at Union College. "I hope people will be inspired by the creative genius of God, expressed not only in the paintings themselves, but in the talents He gives people."

He has displayed his work across the United States and even taught art workshops in seven other countries. McClelland has won numerous "Best of Show" awards and his paintings have been used as illustrations in four books including Hummingbirds of North America, by Dr. Paul Johnsgard.

The McClelland Art Gallery is in the Ortner Center on the Union College campus, 3800 S. 48th Street. Enter the campus from Prescott Avenue. The art gallery is free to the public and open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more information, contact the Ortner Center at 402.486.2545.

Union College hosts leadership seminar simulcast April 18

On Friday, April 18, the Maximum Impact Simulcast: Advance will include over 80,000 business professionals participating via satellite downlink in 600 churches across North America. Union College and the College View Seventh-day Adventist Church, located at 4801 Prescott Ave., are participating as a joint host site for this unprecedented leadership event, which is anticipated to be the largest leadership seminar in 2008. This live seminar, broadcast from Atlanta, Ga., has trained over 250,000 business professionals in the last six years

"We feel that it is very important for both our students and Lincoln's broader community of faith to develop strong leadership principles with a Christian perspective," said Barry Forbes, chair of Union College's Division of Business and Computer Science. "We invite the community to join our campus for this uplifting and informative session with experts from the business world."

Tickets for the full day seminar are available to the public for $59 before April 1, $69 from April 1-17, $79 after April 18. Students not from Union with a valid student ID may attend for $39. Union College students are offered the subsidized rate of $10 while Union employees pay only $20. To order tickets or for more information call Union College at 402.486.2973 or visit www.maximumimpact.com/mis to learn more about the event. The schedule for the Lincoln site of the April 18 event is as follows: registration from 7 to 7:45 a.m., program begins at 8 a.m., lunch (on your own) from 11 a.m. to noon and program ends at 3 p.m.

Last year's Maximum Impact Simulcast, held on Friday, May 11, 2007, was one of the largest gatherings of business leaders ever. After such great success, best-selling author and authority on leadership Dr. John C. Maxwell will once again be joined on stage by legendary leaders including New York Times Bestselling Author Patrick Lencioni; Fast Company Founding Editor Bill Taylor; Former Nike Creative Katalyst Kevin Carroll, Authors Andy Stanley and Andy Andrews, and ESPN Analyst Dick Vitale. The event will be hosted by CBS Sports Analyst Spencer Tillman and action planning will be provided by executive coach Valorie Burton.

"The Maximum Impact Simulcast is about helping people advance," said Jeremie Kubicek, CEO/President of Atlanta-based GiANT Impact, owner of Maximum Impact. "When you leave MIS you will be better equipped as a leader to connect with your team in a manner that fosters growth and builds strong relationships." The business model for the MI Simulcast consists of partnering with churches to bring relevant business and leadership training to workplace leaders in their local community.

Simulcast founder Dr. John C. Maxwell is the author of such best-selling books as The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership and The 17 Indisputable Laws of Teamwork. He also is the founder of Maximum Impact and INJOY, organizations dedicated to providing resources and training for personal and professional growth. Every year he speaks to Fortune 500 companies, international government leaders, and organizations as diverse as the United States Military Academy at West Point, Chick-fil-A, Wal-Mart, the National Football League, Mary Kay, and the Indianapolis 500 Drivers.

The MI Simulcast: Advance will focus on helping each participant in attendance advance at work, in life and as individuals. Each speaker will illuminate certain qualities akin to their personal careers and experience and provide in-depth perspective on how to unleash the influential leadership power in yourself and those around you. Continuing education credit is also available for attending the simulcast.

2008 Maximum Impact Simulcast: Advance

Speaker Bios

John C. Maxwell - John C. Maxwell is an internationally recognized leadership expert, speaker and author who has sold over 13 million books. Every year he speaks to Fortune 500 companies, international government leaders, and organizations from the United States Military Academy to the National Football League. Maxwell has three books that have sold over one million copies, including Developing the Leader Within You.

Bill Taylor - Bill Taylor is an adjunct professor at Babson College, American's top-rated school for entrepreneurship, where he created the "Maverick Seminar at Babson College." Taylor is the co-author of three books and has a new column in the London newspaper The Guardian called "Bill Taylor on Big Ideas."

Kevin Carroll - Kevin Carroll is the author of the highly successful Rules of the Red Rubber Ball and founder of Katalyst Consultancy. After a stint in the Air Force, Carroll became the head athletic trainer for the Philadelphia 76ers before moving to Nike to help the company gain a deeper of understanding of athletic product performance and team dynamics. He was the inspiration for the Lance Armstrong wristband phenomenon.

Patrick Lencioni - Patrick Lencioni is the author of six best-selling books including Five Dysfunctions of a Team and The Three Signs of a Miserable Job. Lencioni is the founder and president of The Table Group, a firm dedicated to providing organizations with ideas, products and services that improve teamwork, clarity and effectiveness.

Spencer Tillman - As an All-American running back for the Oklahoma Sooners, Spencer Tillman was fifth in the Heisman trophy voting in 1983 and captain of the 1985 national championship team. He played in the NFL until 1994 for the Houston Oilers and San Francisco 49ers. Tillman is the studio analyst for College Football Today on CBS and the host of DirecTV's Sunday NFL Ticket.

Andy Stanley - Recognized as a top influential leader for pastors, Andy Stanley is senior pastor of North Point Ministries, one of the faster growing ministries in North America. With campuses in Georgia, more than 20,000 congregants visit his churches each week. Stanley is a best-selling author of many books including The Next Generation Leader and 7 Practices of Effective Ministry.

Dick Vitale - Dick Vitale, one of college basketball's top analysts and ambassadors, joined ESPN during the 1979-1980 season following a successful college and pro coaching careers. Vitale is also a college basketball analyst for ESPN Radio and Sportscenter and writer for ESPN.com and USA Today. In 1983 Vitale was named one of the sport's five most influential personalities and in 1989 recognized as the Sportscasters Association "Sports Personality of the Year."

Andy Andrews - Andy Andrews is an internationally-known speaker and novelist whose combined works, including The Travler's Gift: Seven Decisions that Determine Personal Success, have sold millions of copies worldwide. He has been a guest speaker at the White House at the request of four presidents.

Valerie Burton - A sought after life coach and speaker, Valerie Burton is the author many books including Listen to Your Life and What's Really Holding You Back. Burton is a professional certified coach whose segment on the nationally syndicated radio show "Sharing Life Together" airs on 80 stations nationwide. From 2001-2003, Burton served on the Texas Governor's Commission for Women. She is a former Miss Black Texas, Miss Black USA finalist and runner-up Miss Texas.

Tags: 

Some of my Best Friends are Smiths to be performed by Union College Drama

Performances

Thursday

March 27

7 p.m.

Saturday

March 29

8:30 p.m.

Saturday

April 5

9 p.m.

Union College Drama presents Some of My Best Friends are Smiths, a one-act play by David Compton, directed by Mary Christian, senior English major as a part of her Play Direction class. In the play, Miss Jones and Miss Smith arrive at a quaint English country hotel after a long day's journey only to be told that the hotel does not accept Smiths! The ensuing argument calls on the two travelers, as well as on the audience, to reflect on how prejudice begins and how it should be dealt with.

The play will be performed in Woods Auditorium on the campus of Union College, 3800 South 48th Street. Enter campus from Bancroft Avenue. Tickets will be on sale in the bookstore beginning Monday afternoon, March 24 and at the door (cash or check only please). Tickets cost $4 for students and senior citizens and $6 for adults.

About the cast

Sarah Bartzatt (Shirley Robinson) has played Minnie May in a high school production of Hello Dolly, and last year she appeared as Mrs. Corbin in The Boys Next Door. A sophomore elementary education and native Lincolnite, Sarah enjoys playing the piano and hanging out at Disney World.

Julia Dickman's (Molly Jones) life is a stage, she says, but Smiths is her first venture onto a stage of any other kind. When not saving the world as a senior international rescue and relief major, she loves to cook, rappel, and go water tubing. Julia hails from Savannah, Tenn.

Tori Hudgins (Dora Smith) is a hard-core nerd from Columbia, MD. A freshman double-majoring in mathematics and math education, she lists solving cool math problems as one of her favorite hobbies. She shares Miss Smith's love of backpacking and enjoys music, reading, and scrapbooking. Her past dramatic roles include Cecily in The Importance of Being Earnest, Mrs. Hopkins in My Fair Lady, and Belle in Beauty and the Beast.

Rebeca Salcedo (Mrs. Blake), a senior majoring in journalism and Spanish, comes from Baton Rouge, LA. In her spare time (hahaha), this new actress and long-time drama queen likes to sing, play the piano, read, swim, and go for bike rides.

Sadie Wren (Miss Brown), a sophomore language arts education major who calls Lincoln home, is making her theatrical debut in this production. Her favorite activities include volleyball and swimming.

Mary Christian (director) is a senior English and French major from Hamburg, PA. By way of past theatrical involvement, she has acted in Everyman, Maid to Order, and The Sound of Music and stage managed The Boys Next Door. Nonsense poetry, homemade bread, crochet, and traveling are a few of her favorite things.

Crandall Library receives conservation bookshelf

The Ella Johnson Crandall Memorial Library at Union College will be better able to preserve documents and artifacts for future generations thanks to a gift from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), the primary source of federal funding for America's libraries and museums. Union's library is one of the first institutions to receive the IMLS Connecting to Collections Bookshelf, a set of books, DVDs and online resources. The Bookshelf addresses the philosophy and ethics of collecting, collections management and planning, emergency preparedness and culturally-specific conservation issues.

"We are pleased to announce the first group of IMLS Bookshelf recipients," said Anne-Imelda Radice, director of IMLS. "These small libraries and museums are taking up the charge to care for America's heritage." The 2,000 recipients were chosen by IMLS and the American Association for State and Local History from among the nation's 122,000 libraries and 17,500 museums.

The IMLS Bookshelf is a crucial component of Connecting to Collections: A Call to Action (site: imls.gov), a conservation initiative launched in response to a 2005 study in which Union participated. The study documented the dire state of the nation's collections, especially those held by smaller institutions, which often lack the human and financial resources necessary to adequately care for their collections. "Without immediate action we stand to lose important collections that are at the heart of the American story," Radice said.

Union received the Bookshelf based on an application that described the library's challenges and plans to care for its collection. The Crandall Library's Heritage Room contains publications, documents and artifacts which tell the stories of the college, the College View community and the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

"Preserving our collection has been a big concern for us," said Sabrina Riley, library director. "The library staff has accomplished great things working with limited resources and opportunities, but we realize we can't attain all our goals on our own. The Bookshelf is a big first step toward securing the resources and training we need. It will enable us to better organize, manage and conserve the history entrusted to us."

State Legislature commends Union College

Senator Fulton speaks at Union College's 1000th Student event on Aug. 28, 2007.

Tags: 

Union College Drama to present The Eumenides

Performances

Thursday

Feb. 28

Jobe Martin to speak on creationism

Where many see creatures shaped by chance and stimuli, Jobe Martin sees a Creator's design. Best known for his book and video series entitled The Evolution of a Creationist, Martin will present his view of the evolution and creationism debate in Lincoln during lectures at College View Academy, Union College and the College View Church.

In The Evolution of a Creationist and his follow-up Incredible Creatures that Defy Evolution series, Martin presents the animals and evidence that led him to change his stance on evolution. According to Martin, creatures such as the bombardier beetle and giraffe rely on anatomical features for survival that would have to develop simultaneously in a single generation rather than the result of gradual adaptation over millions of years. Martin says these "incredible creatures" point to a Designer.

Martin will first speak at a chapel service at College View Academy from 8:30-9:15 on Friday, Feb. 29. Then at 1:30 he will lecture the Origins class at Union College, a unique interdisciplinary course that invites students to think analytically and critically about how life began, how life changes and how science and religion interact.

On Saturday, March 1, Martin will present his most in-depth lecture of the weekend at the College View Church from 3-5 p.m. in the Heartland Room. The lecture is free and the public is encouraged to attend. The church is located on the corner of 48th and Prescott; the Heartland Room is on the lower level.

For more information on Martin, visit his site at www.evolutionofacreationist.com.

Tags: 

New student government leadership chosen

This past week students at Union College elected their student leaders for the 2008-2009 school year. In total, 365 people voted in the election. Next year's ASB executive team is:

President – Alicia Archer
Executive Vice President – Kelly Vogler
Financial Vice President – Sabrina Wessels
Social Vice President – Sadie Wren

Congratulations to the winners, and thank you to all those who ran!

Senior Claudia Pech demonstrates range in art exhibit

Beginning Feb. 17, The McClelland Art Gallery will showcase the works of Claudia Pech, senior communication and graphic design major.

"It's just for fun," Pech explained. "Most of the senior exhibits I've seen are a mix of graphic design and fine arts. I didn't want to take away from my graphic design major so I decided to have two exhibits."

In her first show titled "Random Thinkings," there will be at least 16 of her fine arts pieces ranging from watercolors, oil paintings, charcoal drawings to a few photographs.

As a young girl, Pech planned on becoming an artist in Paris. Life soon got in the way and disrupted her aspirations. While in college, however, her dreams resurfaced and partially revitalized as she took every art class available at Union.

"Art moves something within me," Pech said, "I hope my creations make people wonder, think or remember—at least give them a different perspective."

The McClelland Art Gallery is in the Ortner Center on the Union College campus, 3800 S. 48th Street. Enter the campus from Prescott Avenue. The art gallery is free to the public and open daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, contact the Ortner Center at 402.486.2545.

Specialized Career Fair at Union College proves significant success

On Feb. 6, 2008, Union College's Going Global Career Fair brought recruiters and presenters from 20 organizations to the Don Love Building. From big names such the Peace Corps to the less well-known Active Community Team Services (ACTS), the information available to the attending students was invaluable.

"I think this career fair is a great idea and helps a lot of people," said Jeremy Jones, sophomore international rescue and relief major.

Although only 100-120 actually registered for the event, Doug Tallman, IRR associate director, noted that more likely 150-160 students, as well as some faculty, came to browse and meet recruiters.

"I made more meaningful and intelligent contacts in two hours than I've seen in two days," commented Fred Ramsey from Re-Creation Unlimited who said he has done similar fairs at other campuses. "I was impressed. Union's event was the most successful compared to the other Seventh-day Adventist campus I have visited."

Since the IRR program is relatively new, many students have a difficult time figuring out how best to utilize the skills they're learning. Tallman explained how this career fair targeted these students.

"I think IRR majors benefit the most from the fair as far as putting them on a career path that goes with their major." Jones stated, "But, I think everyone can find something that's applicable to them."

Plans are already being made to repeat the success of the Going Global Career Fair next year. Meghan Weese, a graduate assistant for the Outdoor Education Center at Southern Adventist University, encouraged students to attend the event. "The biggest mistake would be not coming," she said.

Union College extends welcome to visiting students

Gymfest

Saturday night, Oct. 13, an audience gathered to enjoy a gymnastic performance hosted by Union College. It was the grand finale to training clinics hosted by Union College with cooperation from University of Nebraska—Lincoln for about 150 academy and middle school students from the Dakotas, Missouri, Colorado and Nebraska. The evening was jump-started by an exhibition of ring skills and tumbling from members of the gymnastic team from UNL.

"It was amazing to be able to see people do flips like that," said Union student Kara McDaniel.

Outside of UNL's special performance, each visiting school as well as Union College's Gymnaires performed solo routines followed by a presentation from the entire group.

"The performance on Saturday was such a success!" Gymnaires' Courtney Haavisto said. "Everyone did great on their routines. It felt so awesome to see some of the moves performed that we helped [the kids] with." Union students, such as sophomore Savannah Bower, were surprised with how agile and flexible the athletes were.

"I wish my body could move like that," she commented.

"We have talented people on the team," Stephanie Eldenburg, a longtime gymnast, said. "We have a lot of potential."

That talent is mirrored in the new head coach, Seth Perkins, who organized the event.

"I think he has a lot of talent to share with the kids." McDaniel said. Eldenburg said Perkins is good at remaining calm and in control during a hectic weekend.

The success of the performance wasn't simply due to the coaches, supportive crowd or fluidity of the show, but also in the impact that it left with the visiting students who stayed with kind hosts in Rees, Prescott and Culver Halls.

"From watching the students and faculty, the other gymnasts seemed really welcome," Bower said. "But that's how the entire atmosphere here is at Union."

Next school year, Union will take its turn hosting Acrofest, a similar but larger training clinic open to gymnastics teams from all colleges and high schools in the North American Division of Seventh-day Adventists.

Volleyball Tournament

Two weeks following Gymfest, another host of visitors were able to attest to Union's hospitality. The weekend of Oct. 26 brought eight teams of girls from across the Midwest to compete against each other in a volleyball tournament. The winners were Midland Academy (Kans.), College View Academy (Neb.), and Campion Academy (Colo.).

"We're really excited about the three new teams from Maplewood, Minnetonka and Dakota Adventist Academy," said Ric Spaulding, athletic director for Union College. "More girls playing on volleyball teams in the Mid-America Union means that's more girls hopefully coming to play at Union College."

Although the visitors, such as senior Molly Gibb, believed that the athletics "were handled well," the accommodations and friendliness of the students were commented on the most.

"This year we tried something new," Spaulding said about feeding the 135 visitors. "We put barcodes on the name tags." Everything ran smoothly, and the new dining system will probably be implemented for future tournaments.

Kayla Rouse, who not only came to the recent Gymfest, but also basketball tournaments for the past three years, stays with girls that she already knows. She thinks Union is very open and welcoming.

"Girls just say 'hi' or open doors," Rouse said on feeling welcomed. "It's not something big, but it just shows that they want you on campus."

Even though Sunnydale sophomore Kristi Fitzpatrick's sister attends Union, Kristi had never been inside any of the buildings until she came for this year's tournament.

"It was a little awkward at first," Fitzpatrick admitted, as she hadn't met her sister's roommate before. "But then it was OK. My sister introduced me to a lot of people." Gibb, Fitzpatrick's teammate, used to be against attending Union College, but with each visit, she becomes more open to the idea.

"Every year keeps getting better and I get more excited about going to college," Gibb said. "Union College seems to offer a lot of opportunities. Everyone is really outgoing and nice. The staff seems really energetic and willing to help the students."

"I think people are nice here," Fitzpatrick agreed. "They just seem friendly. I'll probably end up going here because, after being here, everybody is so friendly. The other colleges seemed really different."

"It's not just our [athletics] department." Spaulding said. "The dorms, students here, Union Market, Ortner Center – there are a lot of different areas working together to make it work."

For team photos from the volleyball tournament, visit Union's athletics site.

"Don't forget me:" Union students evangelize in Borneo

Amy Agosto and friends.

Amy Agosto (shown fifth from left), sophomore international rescue and relief major, spoke about Jesus to children ages 12 to 18 while in Borneo for two weeks this summer. Three of them chose to be baptized.

Elique Semaboye (center, back) met an Indonesian movie star while in Borneo. The young man attended Semaboye's talks each night and ultimately gave his life to Christ.

Amy, Dana and friends.

Amy Agosto and Dana Connell, center, traveled to Borneo to speak in an evangelistic series in the city of Balikpapan. Each experienced God's hand in their preaching and cherishes the relationships they built with local young people.

Just before Dana Connell stepped aboard the plane that would take her back home—half-way around the world—a 15-year old Indonesian girl pressed a school photo I.D. card and a hair clip into Dana's hand. "Don't forget me. Don't forget me," she whispered over and over. The young girl, her parents and her two sisters had bonded with Connell through her summer evangelistic work in Borneo. Upon meeting the youngest girl, Connell sent a note with well wishes to the oldest daughter, who had just undergone thyroid surgery. After Connell's note, the whole family attended her meetings; the girls' mother had never come to church before, in spite of nine years of visits by local Adventist church members. "When I left, all three girls and their mother missed school to say goodbye to me at the airport," Connell says. "All of this bloomed from a seemingly insignificant get-well note. God taught me the impact small, outwardly-insignificant acts can have."

Connell, who graduated in May with a degree in theology, was part of a group of six Union College students, led by Professor of Religion Tom Shepherd, who traveled to Borneo July 13-28. They held evangelistic meetings in the city of Balikpapan in the East Kalimantan district of Borneo, an island in southeast Asia. "Borneo was a place where I could see that the gospel actually meant something to people," Connell said. "I wanted to see people get excited about the power of knowing Jesus." The southern and eastern portions of Borneo, which sits southwest of the Philippines, are part of Indonesia, the largest Muslim nation in the world. "When we arrived in Balikpapan after two days of travel we were overwhelmed with the friendly welcome we received," Shepherd said. "A large group of church members came to greet us at the airport. They welcomed us in their churches provided many meals for our team and were gracious hosts."

Each student was assigned a different site and delivered 19 sermons in 16 days. Their Bible presentations were held in rented halls or churches throughout Balikpapan and the surrounding area. "The program was pretty intensive," said Shepherd who led a similar project in Rwanda two years ago.

Elique Semaboye, a sophomore from [trying to get his home country] Africa, held meetings in a rural area outside of Balikpapan. As a theology major, his work in Borneo was a valuable experience for his future as a pastor. He regularly spoke to 75 to 100 visitors in attendance, including four local ministers of another denomination who sat on the front row taking notes. One evening one of these pastors came up to Semaboye after his sermon, encouraging him by saying, "Thank you for telling us the truth." An Indonesian movie star named Johannes also regularly attended Semaboye's evangelistic programs; the two young men soon became friends. One evening after the meeting Johannes took Semaboye aside said that he had been very inspired by Semaboye's sermons. He wanted Semaboye to pray that he would have the strength to give up being a movie star and follow Jesus.

Amy Agosto, a sophomore international rescue and relief major, held meetings for children ages 12 to 18 at the local Adventist school. Many of them were not Christians, and she felt especially called to reach those who had never heard about Jesus before. "The kids were so inspiring to me," said Agosto, who had a fear of public speaking before she began preaching at the meetings. "The little ones were always so cheerful and I could tell they really loved Jesus. Speaking to them helped me to slowly become more comfortable speaking up front."

Agosto also had the opportunity to interact with a young man who is passionate about following Jesus. One of the attendees at her meetings for children was a 17-year-old named Timothy. He was responsible for the program's music, sound system, and anything else he was needed for. Agosto soon noticed that Timothy, a high school senior, was wise beyond his years. He told her, "Amy, I believe that the young people will finish this great work that God has put us to do." Agosto couldn't agree with Timothy more. "We young people have a work to do as a light to this world," she says. "God is preparing young people around the world to be his tools, bringing the gospel to every nation. I am so excited to be an instrument for God."

At the close of the evangelistic trip the group held a mass meeting with all the sites combined at one location; 45 people were baptized. "It is so rewarding to see people respond to the Gospel," Shepherd said. Among those baptized were three of the children Agosto had preached to and interacted with during her evangelistic outreach. "My time in Borneo helped me to depend on God a lot more. I know that God used my preaching to place a seed in the hearts of those kids."

Pages

Subscribe to News Archive

Loading...