News Archive

Community invited as students end the year with music

As the academic year winds down, students often feel like singing. At Union, the months of April and May are filled with music as students showcase a year's worth of practice and learning.

All events are free and the community is invited to attend. Performances take place in the Engel Recital Hall (in Engel Hall on the corner of Bancroft Ave. and south 48th St.) unless otherwise noted.

Esther Baierl Senior Voice Recital
Sunday, April 13, 3:00 p.m.

Unionaires Spring Vespers Concert
Friday, April 18, 8:00 p.m.
College View Church

Concert Winds Spring Concert
Saturday, April 19, 8:45 p.m.
Union College Gymnasium

UC Chamber Orchestra Spring Concert
Sunday, April 20, 6:00 p.m.

Seth Dunkin Senior Recital
Sunday, April 27, 3:00 p.m.

General Student Recital
Tuesday, April 29 7:30 p.m.

Honors Piano Recital
Wednesday, April 30 7:30 p.m.

Unionaires "Concert at the Capitol"
Thursday, May 8, noon-1:00 p.m.
Nebraska State Capitol Rotunda

Naomi Bruette Junior Recital
Thursday, May 8, 7:00 p.m.
College View Church

Jordan Lang Senior Piano Recital
Thursday, May 8, 8:00 p.m.
College View Church

Erin Flanagan Senior Voice Recital
Saturday, May 10, 8:00 p.m.

Senior art exhibit "Under Construction" in McClelland Art Gallery

Until April 20, The McClelland Art Gallery windows are laced with yellow tape, touting CAUTION and CUDIDO in bold, black lettering. Yet the current display by Union College's Zak Adams, a senior graphic design major, is open and safe to the public for viewing.

Titled Under Construction, a sign just inside the door explains that, as a person, Adams is ever learning and hence continuously under construction. The theme also reflects one of his greatest passions, carpentry.

McClelland exhibits wildlife paintings

The paintings of Jim McClelland are on display in the Union College gallery that shares his name March 23-April 12, 2008. The watercolor and oil paintings on display in the McClelland Art Gallery depict a variety of wildlife with an emphasis on birds ranging from cranes to peacocks.

"Artwork is meant to be shared," says McClelland, professor of art at Union College. "I hope people will be inspired by the creative genius of God, expressed not only in the paintings themselves, but in the talents He gives people."

He has displayed his work across the United States and even taught art workshops in seven other countries. McClelland has won numerous "Best of Show" awards and his paintings have been used as illustrations in four books including Hummingbirds of North America, by Dr. Paul Johnsgard.

The McClelland Art Gallery is in the Ortner Center on the Union College campus, 3800 S. 48th Street. Enter the campus from Prescott Avenue. The art gallery is free to the public and open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more information, contact the Ortner Center at 402.486.2545.

Union College hosts leadership seminar simulcast April 18

On Friday, April 18, the Maximum Impact Simulcast: Advance will include over 80,000 business professionals participating via satellite downlink in 600 churches across North America. Union College and the College View Seventh-day Adventist Church, located at 4801 Prescott Ave., are participating as a joint host site for this unprecedented leadership event, which is anticipated to be the largest leadership seminar in 2008. This live seminar, broadcast from Atlanta, Ga., has trained over 250,000 business professionals in the last six years

"We feel that it is very important for both our students and Lincoln's broader community of faith to develop strong leadership principles with a Christian perspective," said Barry Forbes, chair of Union College's Division of Business and Computer Science. "We invite the community to join our campus for this uplifting and informative session with experts from the business world."

Tickets for the full day seminar are available to the public for $59 before April 1, $69 from April 1-17, $79 after April 18. Students not from Union with a valid student ID may attend for $39. Union College students are offered the subsidized rate of $10 while Union employees pay only $20. To order tickets or for more information call Union College at 402.486.2973 or visit www.maximumimpact.com/mis to learn more about the event. The schedule for the Lincoln site of the April 18 event is as follows: registration from 7 to 7:45 a.m., program begins at 8 a.m., lunch (on your own) from 11 a.m. to noon and program ends at 3 p.m.

Last year's Maximum Impact Simulcast, held on Friday, May 11, 2007, was one of the largest gatherings of business leaders ever. After such great success, best-selling author and authority on leadership Dr. John C. Maxwell will once again be joined on stage by legendary leaders including New York Times Bestselling Author Patrick Lencioni; Fast Company Founding Editor Bill Taylor; Former Nike Creative Katalyst Kevin Carroll, Authors Andy Stanley and Andy Andrews, and ESPN Analyst Dick Vitale. The event will be hosted by CBS Sports Analyst Spencer Tillman and action planning will be provided by executive coach Valorie Burton.

"The Maximum Impact Simulcast is about helping people advance," said Jeremie Kubicek, CEO/President of Atlanta-based GiANT Impact, owner of Maximum Impact. "When you leave MIS you will be better equipped as a leader to connect with your team in a manner that fosters growth and builds strong relationships." The business model for the MI Simulcast consists of partnering with churches to bring relevant business and leadership training to workplace leaders in their local community.

Simulcast founder Dr. John C. Maxwell is the author of such best-selling books as The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership and The 17 Indisputable Laws of Teamwork. He also is the founder of Maximum Impact and INJOY, organizations dedicated to providing resources and training for personal and professional growth. Every year he speaks to Fortune 500 companies, international government leaders, and organizations as diverse as the United States Military Academy at West Point, Chick-fil-A, Wal-Mart, the National Football League, Mary Kay, and the Indianapolis 500 Drivers.

The MI Simulcast: Advance will focus on helping each participant in attendance advance at work, in life and as individuals. Each speaker will illuminate certain qualities akin to their personal careers and experience and provide in-depth perspective on how to unleash the influential leadership power in yourself and those around you. Continuing education credit is also available for attending the simulcast.

2008 Maximum Impact Simulcast: Advance

Speaker Bios

John C. Maxwell - John C. Maxwell is an internationally recognized leadership expert, speaker and author who has sold over 13 million books. Every year he speaks to Fortune 500 companies, international government leaders, and organizations from the United States Military Academy to the National Football League. Maxwell has three books that have sold over one million copies, including Developing the Leader Within You.

Bill Taylor - Bill Taylor is an adjunct professor at Babson College, American's top-rated school for entrepreneurship, where he created the "Maverick Seminar at Babson College." Taylor is the co-author of three books and has a new column in the London newspaper The Guardian called "Bill Taylor on Big Ideas."

Kevin Carroll - Kevin Carroll is the author of the highly successful Rules of the Red Rubber Ball and founder of Katalyst Consultancy. After a stint in the Air Force, Carroll became the head athletic trainer for the Philadelphia 76ers before moving to Nike to help the company gain a deeper of understanding of athletic product performance and team dynamics. He was the inspiration for the Lance Armstrong wristband phenomenon.

Patrick Lencioni - Patrick Lencioni is the author of six best-selling books including Five Dysfunctions of a Team and The Three Signs of a Miserable Job. Lencioni is the founder and president of The Table Group, a firm dedicated to providing organizations with ideas, products and services that improve teamwork, clarity and effectiveness.

Spencer Tillman - As an All-American running back for the Oklahoma Sooners, Spencer Tillman was fifth in the Heisman trophy voting in 1983 and captain of the 1985 national championship team. He played in the NFL until 1994 for the Houston Oilers and San Francisco 49ers. Tillman is the studio analyst for College Football Today on CBS and the host of DirecTV's Sunday NFL Ticket.

Andy Stanley - Recognized as a top influential leader for pastors, Andy Stanley is senior pastor of North Point Ministries, one of the faster growing ministries in North America. With campuses in Georgia, more than 20,000 congregants visit his churches each week. Stanley is a best-selling author of many books including The Next Generation Leader and 7 Practices of Effective Ministry.

Dick Vitale - Dick Vitale, one of college basketball's top analysts and ambassadors, joined ESPN during the 1979-1980 season following a successful college and pro coaching careers. Vitale is also a college basketball analyst for ESPN Radio and Sportscenter and writer for ESPN.com and USA Today. In 1983 Vitale was named one of the sport's five most influential personalities and in 1989 recognized as the Sportscasters Association "Sports Personality of the Year."

Andy Andrews - Andy Andrews is an internationally-known speaker and novelist whose combined works, including The Travler's Gift: Seven Decisions that Determine Personal Success, have sold millions of copies worldwide. He has been a guest speaker at the White House at the request of four presidents.

Valerie Burton - A sought after life coach and speaker, Valerie Burton is the author many books including Listen to Your Life and What's Really Holding You Back. Burton is a professional certified coach whose segment on the nationally syndicated radio show "Sharing Life Together" airs on 80 stations nationwide. From 2001-2003, Burton served on the Texas Governor's Commission for Women. She is a former Miss Black Texas, Miss Black USA finalist and runner-up Miss Texas.

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Some of my Best Friends are Smiths to be performed by Union College Drama

Performances

Thursday

March 27

7 p.m.

Saturday

March 29

8:30 p.m.

Saturday

April 5

9 p.m.

Union College Drama presents Some of My Best Friends are Smiths, a one-act play by David Compton, directed by Mary Christian, senior English major as a part of her Play Direction class. In the play, Miss Jones and Miss Smith arrive at a quaint English country hotel after a long day's journey only to be told that the hotel does not accept Smiths! The ensuing argument calls on the two travelers, as well as on the audience, to reflect on how prejudice begins and how it should be dealt with.

The play will be performed in Woods Auditorium on the campus of Union College, 3800 South 48th Street. Enter campus from Bancroft Avenue. Tickets will be on sale in the bookstore beginning Monday afternoon, March 24 and at the door (cash or check only please). Tickets cost $4 for students and senior citizens and $6 for adults.

About the cast

Sarah Bartzatt (Shirley Robinson) has played Minnie May in a high school production of Hello Dolly, and last year she appeared as Mrs. Corbin in The Boys Next Door. A sophomore elementary education and native Lincolnite, Sarah enjoys playing the piano and hanging out at Disney World.

Julia Dickman's (Molly Jones) life is a stage, she says, but Smiths is her first venture onto a stage of any other kind. When not saving the world as a senior international rescue and relief major, she loves to cook, rappel, and go water tubing. Julia hails from Savannah, Tenn.

Tori Hudgins (Dora Smith) is a hard-core nerd from Columbia, MD. A freshman double-majoring in mathematics and math education, she lists solving cool math problems as one of her favorite hobbies. She shares Miss Smith's love of backpacking and enjoys music, reading, and scrapbooking. Her past dramatic roles include Cecily in The Importance of Being Earnest, Mrs. Hopkins in My Fair Lady, and Belle in Beauty and the Beast.

Rebeca Salcedo (Mrs. Blake), a senior majoring in journalism and Spanish, comes from Baton Rouge, LA. In her spare time (hahaha), this new actress and long-time drama queen likes to sing, play the piano, read, swim, and go for bike rides.

Sadie Wren (Miss Brown), a sophomore language arts education major who calls Lincoln home, is making her theatrical debut in this production. Her favorite activities include volleyball and swimming.

Mary Christian (director) is a senior English and French major from Hamburg, PA. By way of past theatrical involvement, she has acted in Everyman, Maid to Order, and The Sound of Music and stage managed The Boys Next Door. Nonsense poetry, homemade bread, crochet, and traveling are a few of her favorite things.

Crandall Library receives conservation bookshelf

The Ella Johnson Crandall Memorial Library at Union College will be better able to preserve documents and artifacts for future generations thanks to a gift from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), the primary source of federal funding for America's libraries and museums. Union's library is one of the first institutions to receive the IMLS Connecting to Collections Bookshelf, a set of books, DVDs and online resources. The Bookshelf addresses the philosophy and ethics of collecting, collections management and planning, emergency preparedness and culturally-specific conservation issues.

"We are pleased to announce the first group of IMLS Bookshelf recipients," said Anne-Imelda Radice, director of IMLS. "These small libraries and museums are taking up the charge to care for America's heritage." The 2,000 recipients were chosen by IMLS and the American Association for State and Local History from among the nation's 122,000 libraries and 17,500 museums.

The IMLS Bookshelf is a crucial component of Connecting to Collections: A Call to Action (site: imls.gov), a conservation initiative launched in response to a 2005 study in which Union participated. The study documented the dire state of the nation's collections, especially those held by smaller institutions, which often lack the human and financial resources necessary to adequately care for their collections. "Without immediate action we stand to lose important collections that are at the heart of the American story," Radice said.

Union received the Bookshelf based on an application that described the library's challenges and plans to care for its collection. The Crandall Library's Heritage Room contains publications, documents and artifacts which tell the stories of the college, the College View community and the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

"Preserving our collection has been a big concern for us," said Sabrina Riley, library director. "The library staff has accomplished great things working with limited resources and opportunities, but we realize we can't attain all our goals on our own. The Bookshelf is a big first step toward securing the resources and training we need. It will enable us to better organize, manage and conserve the history entrusted to us."

State Legislature commends Union College

Senator Fulton speaks at Union College's 1000th Student event on Aug. 28, 2007.

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Union College Drama to present The Eumenides

Performances

Thursday

Feb. 28

Jobe Martin to speak on creationism

Where many see creatures shaped by chance and stimuli, Jobe Martin sees a Creator's design. Best known for his book and video series entitled The Evolution of a Creationist, Martin will present his view of the evolution and creationism debate in Lincoln during lectures at College View Academy, Union College and the College View Church.

In The Evolution of a Creationist and his follow-up Incredible Creatures that Defy Evolution series, Martin presents the animals and evidence that led him to change his stance on evolution. According to Martin, creatures such as the bombardier beetle and giraffe rely on anatomical features for survival that would have to develop simultaneously in a single generation rather than the result of gradual adaptation over millions of years. Martin says these "incredible creatures" point to a Designer.

Martin will first speak at a chapel service at College View Academy from 8:30-9:15 on Friday, Feb. 29. Then at 1:30 he will lecture the Origins class at Union College, a unique interdisciplinary course that invites students to think analytically and critically about how life began, how life changes and how science and religion interact.

On Saturday, March 1, Martin will present his most in-depth lecture of the weekend at the College View Church from 3-5 p.m. in the Heartland Room. The lecture is free and the public is encouraged to attend. The church is located on the corner of 48th and Prescott; the Heartland Room is on the lower level.

For more information on Martin, visit his site at www.evolutionofacreationist.com.

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New student government leadership chosen

This past week students at Union College elected their student leaders for the 2008-2009 school year. In total, 365 people voted in the election. Next year's ASB executive team is:

President – Alicia Archer
Executive Vice President – Kelly Vogler
Financial Vice President – Sabrina Wessels
Social Vice President – Sadie Wren

Congratulations to the winners, and thank you to all those who ran!

Senior Claudia Pech demonstrates range in art exhibit

Beginning Feb. 17, The McClelland Art Gallery will showcase the works of Claudia Pech, senior communication and graphic design major.

"It's just for fun," Pech explained. "Most of the senior exhibits I've seen are a mix of graphic design and fine arts. I didn't want to take away from my graphic design major so I decided to have two exhibits."

In her first show titled "Random Thinkings," there will be at least 16 of her fine arts pieces ranging from watercolors, oil paintings, charcoal drawings to a few photographs.

As a young girl, Pech planned on becoming an artist in Paris. Life soon got in the way and disrupted her aspirations. While in college, however, her dreams resurfaced and partially revitalized as she took every art class available at Union.

"Art moves something within me," Pech said, "I hope my creations make people wonder, think or remember—at least give them a different perspective."

The McClelland Art Gallery is in the Ortner Center on the Union College campus, 3800 S. 48th Street. Enter the campus from Prescott Avenue. The art gallery is free to the public and open daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, contact the Ortner Center at 402.486.2545.

Specialized Career Fair at Union College proves significant success

On Feb. 6, 2008, Union College's Going Global Career Fair brought recruiters and presenters from 20 organizations to the Don Love Building. From big names such the Peace Corps to the less well-known Active Community Team Services (ACTS), the information available to the attending students was invaluable.

"I think this career fair is a great idea and helps a lot of people," said Jeremy Jones, sophomore international rescue and relief major.

Although only 100-120 actually registered for the event, Doug Tallman, IRR associate director, noted that more likely 150-160 students, as well as some faculty, came to browse and meet recruiters.

"I made more meaningful and intelligent contacts in two hours than I've seen in two days," commented Fred Ramsey from Re-Creation Unlimited who said he has done similar fairs at other campuses. "I was impressed. Union's event was the most successful compared to the other Seventh-day Adventist campus I have visited."

Since the IRR program is relatively new, many students have a difficult time figuring out how best to utilize the skills they're learning. Tallman explained how this career fair targeted these students.

"I think IRR majors benefit the most from the fair as far as putting them on a career path that goes with their major." Jones stated, "But, I think everyone can find something that's applicable to them."

Plans are already being made to repeat the success of the Going Global Career Fair next year. Meghan Weese, a graduate assistant for the Outdoor Education Center at Southern Adventist University, encouraged students to attend the event. "The biggest mistake would be not coming," she said.

Union College extends welcome to visiting students

Gymfest

Saturday night, Oct. 13, an audience gathered to enjoy a gymnastic performance hosted by Union College. It was the grand finale to training clinics hosted by Union College with cooperation from University of Nebraska—Lincoln for about 150 academy and middle school students from the Dakotas, Missouri, Colorado and Nebraska. The evening was jump-started by an exhibition of ring skills and tumbling from members of the gymnastic team from UNL.

"It was amazing to be able to see people do flips like that," said Union student Kara McDaniel.

Outside of UNL's special performance, each visiting school as well as Union College's Gymnaires performed solo routines followed by a presentation from the entire group.

"The performance on Saturday was such a success!" Gymnaires' Courtney Haavisto said. "Everyone did great on their routines. It felt so awesome to see some of the moves performed that we helped [the kids] with." Union students, such as sophomore Savannah Bower, were surprised with how agile and flexible the athletes were.

"I wish my body could move like that," she commented.

"We have talented people on the team," Stephanie Eldenburg, a longtime gymnast, said. "We have a lot of potential."

That talent is mirrored in the new head coach, Seth Perkins, who organized the event.

"I think he has a lot of talent to share with the kids." McDaniel said. Eldenburg said Perkins is good at remaining calm and in control during a hectic weekend.

The success of the performance wasn't simply due to the coaches, supportive crowd or fluidity of the show, but also in the impact that it left with the visiting students who stayed with kind hosts in Rees, Prescott and Culver Halls.

"From watching the students and faculty, the other gymnasts seemed really welcome," Bower said. "But that's how the entire atmosphere here is at Union."

Next school year, Union will take its turn hosting Acrofest, a similar but larger training clinic open to gymnastics teams from all colleges and high schools in the North American Division of Seventh-day Adventists.

Volleyball Tournament

Two weeks following Gymfest, another host of visitors were able to attest to Union's hospitality. The weekend of Oct. 26 brought eight teams of girls from across the Midwest to compete against each other in a volleyball tournament. The winners were Midland Academy (Kans.), College View Academy (Neb.), and Campion Academy (Colo.).

"We're really excited about the three new teams from Maplewood, Minnetonka and Dakota Adventist Academy," said Ric Spaulding, athletic director for Union College. "More girls playing on volleyball teams in the Mid-America Union means that's more girls hopefully coming to play at Union College."

Although the visitors, such as senior Molly Gibb, believed that the athletics "were handled well," the accommodations and friendliness of the students were commented on the most.

"This year we tried something new," Spaulding said about feeding the 135 visitors. "We put barcodes on the name tags." Everything ran smoothly, and the new dining system will probably be implemented for future tournaments.

Kayla Rouse, who not only came to the recent Gymfest, but also basketball tournaments for the past three years, stays with girls that she already knows. She thinks Union is very open and welcoming.

"Girls just say 'hi' or open doors," Rouse said on feeling welcomed. "It's not something big, but it just shows that they want you on campus."

Even though Sunnydale sophomore Kristi Fitzpatrick's sister attends Union, Kristi had never been inside any of the buildings until she came for this year's tournament.

"It was a little awkward at first," Fitzpatrick admitted, as she hadn't met her sister's roommate before. "But then it was OK. My sister introduced me to a lot of people." Gibb, Fitzpatrick's teammate, used to be against attending Union College, but with each visit, she becomes more open to the idea.

"Every year keeps getting better and I get more excited about going to college," Gibb said. "Union College seems to offer a lot of opportunities. Everyone is really outgoing and nice. The staff seems really energetic and willing to help the students."

"I think people are nice here," Fitzpatrick agreed. "They just seem friendly. I'll probably end up going here because, after being here, everybody is so friendly. The other colleges seemed really different."

"It's not just our [athletics] department." Spaulding said. "The dorms, students here, Union Market, Ortner Center – there are a lot of different areas working together to make it work."

For team photos from the volleyball tournament, visit Union's athletics site.

"Don't forget me:" Union students evangelize in Borneo

Amy Agosto and friends.

Amy Agosto (shown fifth from left), sophomore international rescue and relief major, spoke about Jesus to children ages 12 to 18 while in Borneo for two weeks this summer. Three of them chose to be baptized.

Elique Semaboye (center, back) met an Indonesian movie star while in Borneo. The young man attended Semaboye's talks each night and ultimately gave his life to Christ.

Amy, Dana and friends.

Amy Agosto and Dana Connell, center, traveled to Borneo to speak in an evangelistic series in the city of Balikpapan. Each experienced God's hand in their preaching and cherishes the relationships they built with local young people.

Just before Dana Connell stepped aboard the plane that would take her back home—half-way around the world—a 15-year old Indonesian girl pressed a school photo I.D. card and a hair clip into Dana's hand. "Don't forget me. Don't forget me," she whispered over and over. The young girl, her parents and her two sisters had bonded with Connell through her summer evangelistic work in Borneo. Upon meeting the youngest girl, Connell sent a note with well wishes to the oldest daughter, who had just undergone thyroid surgery. After Connell's note, the whole family attended her meetings; the girls' mother had never come to church before, in spite of nine years of visits by local Adventist church members. "When I left, all three girls and their mother missed school to say goodbye to me at the airport," Connell says. "All of this bloomed from a seemingly insignificant get-well note. God taught me the impact small, outwardly-insignificant acts can have."

Connell, who graduated in May with a degree in theology, was part of a group of six Union College students, led by Professor of Religion Tom Shepherd, who traveled to Borneo July 13-28. They held evangelistic meetings in the city of Balikpapan in the East Kalimantan district of Borneo, an island in southeast Asia. "Borneo was a place where I could see that the gospel actually meant something to people," Connell said. "I wanted to see people get excited about the power of knowing Jesus." The southern and eastern portions of Borneo, which sits southwest of the Philippines, are part of Indonesia, the largest Muslim nation in the world. "When we arrived in Balikpapan after two days of travel we were overwhelmed with the friendly welcome we received," Shepherd said. "A large group of church members came to greet us at the airport. They welcomed us in their churches provided many meals for our team and were gracious hosts."

Each student was assigned a different site and delivered 19 sermons in 16 days. Their Bible presentations were held in rented halls or churches throughout Balikpapan and the surrounding area. "The program was pretty intensive," said Shepherd who led a similar project in Rwanda two years ago.

Elique Semaboye, a sophomore from [trying to get his home country] Africa, held meetings in a rural area outside of Balikpapan. As a theology major, his work in Borneo was a valuable experience for his future as a pastor. He regularly spoke to 75 to 100 visitors in attendance, including four local ministers of another denomination who sat on the front row taking notes. One evening one of these pastors came up to Semaboye after his sermon, encouraging him by saying, "Thank you for telling us the truth." An Indonesian movie star named Johannes also regularly attended Semaboye's evangelistic programs; the two young men soon became friends. One evening after the meeting Johannes took Semaboye aside said that he had been very inspired by Semaboye's sermons. He wanted Semaboye to pray that he would have the strength to give up being a movie star and follow Jesus.

Amy Agosto, a sophomore international rescue and relief major, held meetings for children ages 12 to 18 at the local Adventist school. Many of them were not Christians, and she felt especially called to reach those who had never heard about Jesus before. "The kids were so inspiring to me," said Agosto, who had a fear of public speaking before she began preaching at the meetings. "The little ones were always so cheerful and I could tell they really loved Jesus. Speaking to them helped me to slowly become more comfortable speaking up front."

Agosto also had the opportunity to interact with a young man who is passionate about following Jesus. One of the attendees at her meetings for children was a 17-year-old named Timothy. He was responsible for the program's music, sound system, and anything else he was needed for. Agosto soon noticed that Timothy, a high school senior, was wise beyond his years. He told her, "Amy, I believe that the young people will finish this great work that God has put us to do." Agosto couldn't agree with Timothy more. "We young people have a work to do as a light to this world," she says. "God is preparing young people around the world to be his tools, bringing the gospel to every nation. I am so excited to be an instrument for God."

At the close of the evangelistic trip the group held a mass meeting with all the sites combined at one location; 45 people were baptized. "It is so rewarding to see people respond to the Gospel," Shepherd said. Among those baptized were three of the children Agosto had preached to and interacted with during her evangelistic outreach. "My time in Borneo helped me to depend on God a lot more. I know that God used my preaching to place a seed in the hearts of those kids."

Contest posters promote diversity in McClelland Art Gallery

"Posters are very effective because they distill a message," says Joann Herrington, the chair of the Multicultural Committee at Union College. "[Viewers] only need to look at a poster for a few seconds and the message jumps out at them. It's very effective in communicating a message."

250 students join Union College to "Sing for Peace"

Wednesday, Jan. 30 marks the beginning of Mid-America Union's 55th annual Music Festival, themed "Sing for Peace – Long Live Love". Both choral and keyboard students are featured this year with several guest directors, headed by Union College professors Dr. Daniel Lynn and Dr. Ryan Wells. In addition, Dr. Gerald Holbrook, a nationally recognized expert in Monophonic Gregorian chant, and Oscar Harriott, a local gospel music expert, will aid with the music clinics.

Union College will host 250 students from 12 Adventist high schools. Though most hail from the Midwest, participanting schools will come from as far away as New York and Utah. The most gifted and skilled students from each institution are invited to Music Festival to expand their melodic horizons.

"The festival is a unique opportunity for the talented music students to all come together and create music," Dr. Lynn explained. "I'm excited about working with these talented students and having them experience great music."

With 14-hours of rehearsal, the combined effort of the directors, visitors and Union's own choral performaers will culminate in two performances open to the community.

Headline concerts are Friday, Feb. 1 at 7:30 p.m. and Sabbath, Feb. 2 at 4:15 p.m. Both concerts are in the College View Church, 48th and Prescott, and are free and open to the public. Additionally, a piano recital featuring an elite group of visiting student pianists is scheduled for Friday afternoon at 1:30 p.m. in the Engel Recital Hall. Contact the Division of Fine Arts at 402.486.2553 for more information.

Communication class organizes benefit concert for Invisible Children

Union College communication students are putting textbook tactics into practice by organizing a benefit concert for Invisible Children on Sunday, Feb. 10 at 7:30 p.m. The concert will take place at the College View Seventh-day Adventist Church (South 48th St. and Prescott Ave.)

Invisible Children is a nonprofit organization established in 2003 to help the homeless and orphaned children of Uganda. More than 20 years of civil conflict in the country has created a need for educational and economic opportunities among Ugandan youth that Invisible Children hopes to address.

So long Charlie Brown: Union replaces venerable administrative tool

For the last 30 years, little has happened at Union College without the help of Charlie. From payroll to phone calls, grades to room reservations, Charlie does it all. In the Peanuts-inspired naming system of Union College computer systems, the server known as Charlie (as in Charlie Brown) has always been the star. The hardware has been upgraded countless times over the years and new features have been added to the software, but at the core, Union College has relied on the same system for three decades.

Union welcomes guest pianist for Jan. 15 chamber recital; master classes

On Tuesday, Jan. 15 at 7 p.m. Dr. Frank Restesan of the Union College music department will perform a violin and piano concert along with internationally renowned pianist Dr. Kaestner Robertson. The concert will take place in Engel Hall Recital Room (corner of South 48th St. and Bancroft Ave.).

The music featured will be from the late Romantic period into the early 20th century (1850-1935). "This concert is essentially a mosaic of the major musical culture during this time in Germany, France and England," Restesan said. "The three pieces that we will perform are probably the most important works written for violin and piano chamber music for the time period."

This concert is the first of a winter-spring tour for Restesan and Robertson. Other stops include Atlantic Union College in South Lancaster, Mass., and Andrews University in Berrien Springs, Mich.

Restesan, who joined the faculty of Union College in fall 2007, is the director of the Chamber Orchestra, the Golden Cords String Quartet and coordinator of music history. Restesan holds a doctorate in performance and orchestral conducting from the University of Arizona. He has appeared on stages around the world including Romania, Spain, Puerto Rico and Carnegie Hall in New York City.

Robertson has gained an international reputation as a pianist and organist. Currently he is a professor of music at Atlantic Union College. Robertson has given solo and collaborative recitals around the world including performances in Barbados, Bermuda, France, England and his native Jamaica.

During his Lincoln visit, Robertson will be offering piano master classes that will be open to Union College students as well as the community. The classes will be on Jan. 16 and 17 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. For more information about the concert or master classes, please contact the Division of Fine Arts at 486-2553.

Sara Groves to perform free concert

On Friday, Jan. 18, Union College will host a free concert by Christian singer/songwriter Sara Groves. Groves also performed at Union College in 2002. The concert will be held at College View Church, located at the corner of 48th and Prescott, at 7:30 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

"Hearing Sara Groves changed my entire outlook on Christian music," Scott Cushman, an alumnus who attended her 2002 concert at the college. "Relaxed, thoughtful and soulful, I went home feeling closer to God and telling everyone I know to listen to Grove's album."

In 1998 Groves transitioned from teaching at a high school in Minnesota to full-time musician. That year also Groves released her first album, Past the Wishing.

Since then, she's put out five more albums, been nominated for three Dove Awards, and CCM Magazine named her Christian music artist of the year and gave its "Album of the Year" award to her 2005 release Add to the Beauty.

Groves puts a lot of herself into her music. She brings sincere, candidly truthful lyrics to her low-key, acoustic music. In addition to recording, Groves gives over 120 performances each year.

Seating is free but limited. College View Church will seat 1,700 on a first come, first serve basis.

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McClelland Art Gallery displays work by photography students

LINCOLN— An array of 30 photographs debuted in the McClelland Art Gallery on Sunday, Dec. 9 at 7:30 p.m. Students from the photography class taught by Bruce Forbes are displaying three of their best pictures taken during the course. The diversity of the students' personalities is evident in the exhibit, ranging from digital camera work to film, and black and white to color.

Senior display "Unlike the Rest" at McClelland Art Gallery

LINCOLN—Running until Dec. 8 in the McClelland Art Gallery, "Unlike the Rest" is titled appropriately. Union College senior Josh Morris named each of the 40 pieces on display after rock songs. During the debut, some of the songs played in the background adding to the ambiance.

Although unintentional, each gallery section of Morris' senior exhibit reflects a small part of his personality. The fine art pieces display his cheekiness and humor; the photography gives a peek into his calm, easy going manner; and the photo-shopped work shows his edgy and outgoing side.

Community invited to band and choral holiday concerts, Dec. 14, 15

Union College invites the community to celebrate the holiday season with music during the college's annual choral and band concerts. Admission and parking for both concerts are free.

  • "The Nativity of St. Luke" by Randall Thompson will feature Union College vocal soloists and choirs on Dec. 14 at 7:30 p.m. in the College View Seventh-day Adventist Church (4810 Prescott Ave.).
  • The Union College band and other instrumental groups will perform a Christmas concert on Dec. 15 at 7:30 p.m. in the college Gymnasium (enter campus from Prescott Ave.).
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