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Jobe Martin to speak on creationism

Where many see creatures shaped by chance and stimuli, Jobe Martin sees a Creator's design. Best known for his book and video series entitled The Evolution of a Creationist, Martin will present his view of the evolution and creationism debate in Lincoln during lectures at College View Academy, Union College and the College View Church.

In The Evolution of a Creationist and his follow-up Incredible Creatures that Defy Evolution series, Martin presents the animals and evidence that led him to change his stance on evolution. According to Martin, creatures such as the bombardier beetle and giraffe rely on anatomical features for survival that would have to develop simultaneously in a single generation rather than the result of gradual adaptation over millions of years. Martin says these "incredible creatures" point to a Designer.

Martin will first speak at a chapel service at College View Academy from 8:30-9:15 on Friday, Feb. 29. Then at 1:30 he will lecture the Origins class at Union College, a unique interdisciplinary course that invites students to think analytically and critically about how life began, how life changes and how science and religion interact.

On Saturday, March 1, Martin will present his most in-depth lecture of the weekend at the College View Church from 3-5 p.m. in the Heartland Room. The lecture is free and the public is encouraged to attend. The church is located on the corner of 48th and Prescott; the Heartland Room is on the lower level.

For more information on Martin, visit his site at www.evolutionofacreationist.com.

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New student government leadership chosen

This past week students at Union College elected their student leaders for the 2008-2009 school year. In total, 365 people voted in the election. Next year's ASB executive team is:

President – Alicia Archer
Executive Vice President – Kelly Vogler
Financial Vice President – Sabrina Wessels
Social Vice President – Sadie Wren

Congratulations to the winners, and thank you to all those who ran!

Senior Claudia Pech demonstrates range in art exhibit

Beginning Feb. 17, The McClelland Art Gallery will showcase the works of Claudia Pech, senior communication and graphic design major.

"It's just for fun," Pech explained. "Most of the senior exhibits I've seen are a mix of graphic design and fine arts. I didn't want to take away from my graphic design major so I decided to have two exhibits."

In her first show titled "Random Thinkings," there will be at least 16 of her fine arts pieces ranging from watercolors, oil paintings, charcoal drawings to a few photographs.

As a young girl, Pech planned on becoming an artist in Paris. Life soon got in the way and disrupted her aspirations. While in college, however, her dreams resurfaced and partially revitalized as she took every art class available at Union.

"Art moves something within me," Pech said, "I hope my creations make people wonder, think or remember—at least give them a different perspective."

The McClelland Art Gallery is in the Ortner Center on the Union College campus, 3800 S. 48th Street. Enter the campus from Prescott Avenue. The art gallery is free to the public and open daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, contact the Ortner Center at 402.486.2545.

Union College receives President's Honor Roll Award for Service

Union College extends welcome to visiting students

Gymfest

Saturday night, Oct. 13, an audience gathered to enjoy a gymnastic performance hosted by Union College. It was the grand finale to training clinics hosted by Union College with cooperation from University of Nebraska—Lincoln for about 150 academy and middle school students from the Dakotas, Missouri, Colorado and Nebraska. The evening was jump-started by an exhibition of ring skills and tumbling from members of the gymnastic team from UNL.

"It was amazing to be able to see people do flips like that," said Union student Kara McDaniel.

Outside of UNL's special performance, each visiting school as well as Union College's Gymnaires performed solo routines followed by a presentation from the entire group.

"The performance on Saturday was such a success!" Gymnaires' Courtney Haavisto said. "Everyone did great on their routines. It felt so awesome to see some of the moves performed that we helped [the kids] with." Union students, such as sophomore Savannah Bower, were surprised with how agile and flexible the athletes were.

"I wish my body could move like that," she commented.

"We have talented people on the team," Stephanie Eldenburg, a longtime gymnast, said. "We have a lot of potential."

That talent is mirrored in the new head coach, Seth Perkins, who organized the event.

"I think he has a lot of talent to share with the kids." McDaniel said. Eldenburg said Perkins is good at remaining calm and in control during a hectic weekend.

The success of the performance wasn't simply due to the coaches, supportive crowd or fluidity of the show, but also in the impact that it left with the visiting students who stayed with kind hosts in Rees, Prescott and Culver Halls.

"From watching the students and faculty, the other gymnasts seemed really welcome," Bower said. "But that's how the entire atmosphere here is at Union."

Next school year, Union will take its turn hosting Acrofest, a similar but larger training clinic open to gymnastics teams from all colleges and high schools in the North American Division of Seventh-day Adventists.

Volleyball Tournament

Two weeks following Gymfest, another host of visitors were able to attest to Union's hospitality. The weekend of Oct. 26 brought eight teams of girls from across the Midwest to compete against each other in a volleyball tournament. The winners were Midland Academy (Kans.), College View Academy (Neb.), and Campion Academy (Colo.).

"We're really excited about the three new teams from Maplewood, Minnetonka and Dakota Adventist Academy," said Ric Spaulding, athletic director for Union College. "More girls playing on volleyball teams in the Mid-America Union means that's more girls hopefully coming to play at Union College."

Although the visitors, such as senior Molly Gibb, believed that the athletics "were handled well," the accommodations and friendliness of the students were commented on the most.

"This year we tried something new," Spaulding said about feeding the 135 visitors. "We put barcodes on the name tags." Everything ran smoothly, and the new dining system will probably be implemented for future tournaments.

Kayla Rouse, who not only came to the recent Gymfest, but also basketball tournaments for the past three years, stays with girls that she already knows. She thinks Union is very open and welcoming.

"Girls just say 'hi' or open doors," Rouse said on feeling welcomed. "It's not something big, but it just shows that they want you on campus."

Even though Sunnydale sophomore Kristi Fitzpatrick's sister attends Union, Kristi had never been inside any of the buildings until she came for this year's tournament.

"It was a little awkward at first," Fitzpatrick admitted, as she hadn't met her sister's roommate before. "But then it was OK. My sister introduced me to a lot of people." Gibb, Fitzpatrick's teammate, used to be against attending Union College, but with each visit, she becomes more open to the idea.

"Every year keeps getting better and I get more excited about going to college," Gibb said. "Union College seems to offer a lot of opportunities. Everyone is really outgoing and nice. The staff seems really energetic and willing to help the students."

"I think people are nice here," Fitzpatrick agreed. "They just seem friendly. I'll probably end up going here because, after being here, everybody is so friendly. The other colleges seemed really different."

"It's not just our [athletics] department." Spaulding said. "The dorms, students here, Union Market, Ortner Center – there are a lot of different areas working together to make it work."

For team photos from the volleyball tournament, visit Union's athletics site.

Contest posters promote diversity in McClelland Art Gallery

"Posters are very effective because they distill a message," says Joann Herrington, the chair of the Multicultural Committee at Union College. "[Viewers] only need to look at a poster for a few seconds and the message jumps out at them. It's very effective in communicating a message."

250 students join Union College to "Sing for Peace"

Wednesday, Jan. 30 marks the beginning of Mid-America Union's 55th annual Music Festival, themed "Sing for Peace – Long Live Love". Both choral and keyboard students are featured this year with several guest directors, headed by Union College professors Dr. Daniel Lynn and Dr. Ryan Wells. In addition, Dr. Gerald Holbrook, a nationally recognized expert in Monophonic Gregorian chant, and Oscar Harriott, a local gospel music expert, will aid with the music clinics.

Union College will host 250 students from 12 Adventist high schools. Though most hail from the Midwest, participanting schools will come from as far away as New York and Utah. The most gifted and skilled students from each institution are invited to Music Festival to expand their melodic horizons.

"The festival is a unique opportunity for the talented music students to all come together and create music," Dr. Lynn explained. "I'm excited about working with these talented students and having them experience great music."

With 14-hours of rehearsal, the combined effort of the directors, visitors and Union's own choral performaers will culminate in two performances open to the community.

Headline concerts are Friday, Feb. 1 at 7:30 p.m. and Sabbath, Feb. 2 at 4:15 p.m. Both concerts are in the College View Church, 48th and Prescott, and are free and open to the public. Additionally, a piano recital featuring an elite group of visiting student pianists is scheduled for Friday afternoon at 1:30 p.m. in the Engel Recital Hall. Contact the Division of Fine Arts at 402.486.2553 for more information.

Communication class organizes benefit concert for Invisible Children

Union College communication students are putting textbook tactics into practice by organizing a benefit concert for Invisible Children on Sunday, Feb. 10 at 7:30 p.m. The concert will take place at the College View Seventh-day Adventist Church (South 48th St. and Prescott Ave.)

Invisible Children is a nonprofit organization established in 2003 to help the homeless and orphaned children of Uganda. More than 20 years of civil conflict in the country has created a need for educational and economic opportunities among Ugandan youth that Invisible Children hopes to address.

New professor and new facility debut for fall chamber music concerts

Union String Quartet

The Golden Chords String Quartet, Tom Shepherd, cellist, Frank Restesan, first violin, Derek Bower, violist, and Tim Parfet, second violin.

LINCOLN—Union College Chamber Orchestra and the Golden Cords string quartet will present fall concerts under the direction of new Union College associate professor of music, Dr. Frank Restesan.

On Sunday, Nov. 11, 6 p.m. the Union College Chamber Orchestra will perform in the newly opened atrium to the College View Seventh-day Adventist Church (4801 Prescott Ave.). This Fall Chamber Concert is the debut performance in the new wing of the College View church. The concert will include one romantic selection and three baroque pieces. Freshman flutist Sarah Kohls will be a featured soloist for a Vivaldi concerto. Breanna Thornton, 14-year-old guest violinist will be featured as well.

On Monday, Nov. 12, 7 p.m., the Golden Cords string quartet will perform in a Chamber Music Concert in the Engel Hall Recital Room (corner of S. 48th St. and Bancroft Ave.). Program highlights will include a quartet by Hayden and Corelli's Christmas Concerto featuring Dr. Ryan Wells as the keyboard accompanist.

Restesan joined the Union College faculty this school year. In addition to leading the chamber groups, Restesan is the director of the Union College Band. He holds master's degrees in musical stylistics and in music performance as well as a doctorate in conducting from the University of Arizona. Restesan's career has included acting as soloist and concertmaster of the Chautauqua Festival Orchestra (N.Y), the New England Symphonic Ensemble, The University of Arizona Symphony Orchestra, Tucson Chamber Orchestra and core member of the Tucson Symphony. He has studied at the State Conservatory in Cluj (Klausenburg) Romania, with Istvan Ruha, the Bachakademie in Stuttgart, Germany with Dozent Peter Streicher and Helmut Rilling and at The University of Arizona. Dr. Restesan's past teaching appointments include positions as orchestra director, strings and chamber music instructor at Atlantic Union College (Mass.), Antillean Adventist University (Puerto Rico) and Walla Walla College (Wash.). Restesan has appeared on prestigious stages around the world including recitals and concerts in Romania, Hungary, Germany, France, Spain, Holland, Puerto Rico and the legendary Carnegie Hall in New York City.

McClelland Art Gallery displays diverse pottery

Diversity produces much of the beauty found on campus at Union College. Running until Nov. 4, the eclectic pottery exhibit includes three artists: Jovannah Poor Bear, sophomore elementary education major; Kimmy Wills, junior biology major; and Bruce Forbes, associate professor of art. The trio of artists bring a wide range of style and technique to the McClelland Art Gallery.

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