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Communication class organizes benefit concert for Invisible Children

Union College communication students are putting textbook tactics into practice by organizing a benefit concert for Invisible Children on Sunday, Feb. 10 at 7:30 p.m. The concert will take place at the College View Seventh-day Adventist Church (South 48th St. and Prescott Ave.)

Invisible Children is a nonprofit organization established in 2003 to help the homeless and orphaned children of Uganda. More than 20 years of civil conflict in the country has created a need for educational and economic opportunities among Ugandan youth that Invisible Children hopes to address.

New professor and new facility debut for fall chamber music concerts

Union String Quartet

The Golden Chords String Quartet, Tom Shepherd, cellist, Frank Restesan, first violin, Derek Bower, violist, and Tim Parfet, second violin.

LINCOLN—Union College Chamber Orchestra and the Golden Cords string quartet will present fall concerts under the direction of new Union College associate professor of music, Dr. Frank Restesan.

On Sunday, Nov. 11, 6 p.m. the Union College Chamber Orchestra will perform in the newly opened atrium to the College View Seventh-day Adventist Church (4801 Prescott Ave.). This Fall Chamber Concert is the debut performance in the new wing of the College View church. The concert will include one romantic selection and three baroque pieces. Freshman flutist Sarah Kohls will be a featured soloist for a Vivaldi concerto. Breanna Thornton, 14-year-old guest violinist will be featured as well.

On Monday, Nov. 12, 7 p.m., the Golden Cords string quartet will perform in a Chamber Music Concert in the Engel Hall Recital Room (corner of S. 48th St. and Bancroft Ave.). Program highlights will include a quartet by Hayden and Corelli's Christmas Concerto featuring Dr. Ryan Wells as the keyboard accompanist.

Restesan joined the Union College faculty this school year. In addition to leading the chamber groups, Restesan is the director of the Union College Band. He holds master's degrees in musical stylistics and in music performance as well as a doctorate in conducting from the University of Arizona. Restesan's career has included acting as soloist and concertmaster of the Chautauqua Festival Orchestra (N.Y), the New England Symphonic Ensemble, The University of Arizona Symphony Orchestra, Tucson Chamber Orchestra and core member of the Tucson Symphony. He has studied at the State Conservatory in Cluj (Klausenburg) Romania, with Istvan Ruha, the Bachakademie in Stuttgart, Germany with Dozent Peter Streicher and Helmut Rilling and at The University of Arizona. Dr. Restesan's past teaching appointments include positions as orchestra director, strings and chamber music instructor at Atlantic Union College (Mass.), Antillean Adventist University (Puerto Rico) and Walla Walla College (Wash.). Restesan has appeared on prestigious stages around the world including recitals and concerts in Romania, Hungary, Germany, France, Spain, Holland, Puerto Rico and the legendary Carnegie Hall in New York City.

McClelland Art Gallery displays diverse pottery

Diversity produces much of the beauty found on campus at Union College. Running until Nov. 4, the eclectic pottery exhibit includes three artists: Jovannah Poor Bear, sophomore elementary education major; Kimmy Wills, junior biology major; and Bruce Forbes, associate professor of art. The trio of artists bring a wide range of style and technique to the McClelland Art Gallery.

Student photography on display in the McClelland Art Gallery

Volunteers impact Lincoln Thursday, Sept. 6

Ann Bryant, Union College student chaplain and junior business major, gets excited when her peers have big ideas. "I want to start a tutoring program for refugees and immigrants in Lincoln who don't speak English," said senior Katie Carlson when she came to see Bryant in Campus Ministries recently. "And I want to kick it off during Project Impact next week."

Never mind the short notice, Bryant gave the idea an enthusiastic go-ahead. "We'll do it. How can we help you make this happen?" Bryant said.

Union College exceeds 1,000 students for first time in 24 years

LINCOLN—At 10:28 a.m. on the last day registration was open, Serhiy Horokhovskyy became Union College's 1,000th student of the 2007-2008 school year. A senior religion major from Ukraine, Horokhovskyy is the first student since 1983 to help Union College cross the 1000 enrollment mark. By the end of the close of registration on Tuesday, Aug. 28, Union College's official enrollment reached 1,015 students with a full time equivalence of 909.5.

To celebrate the 1,000-student milestone, Union College is invited all students and employees to a free lunch served on the campus Tribute Terrace. In addition to the meal and ice cream from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 28, festivities included a short program. Remarks and recognition of the Enrollment Services team by Union College President David Smith were followed by a college-wide sing-a-long of the well-loved school song, "Slinga de Ink." State Senator Tony Fulton joined in the festivities and added his congratulations and support.

"Students come to Union College for many reasons—caring campus family, a Christian atmosphere and for unique programs like international rescue and relief and physician assistant studies," President Smith said. "One thousand is just a number, but the fact that more and more students value Union's campus culture makes me proud of the students, faculty and staff who have invested themselves in Union."

Union's campus has become a home-away-from home for a diverse group of students from 49 states and 26 countries. Four out of five Union students are from outside of Nebraska, that's a higher percentage of non-resident students than any other college in the state.

"When we recruit new students for the college, we don't just sell Union, we sell Nebraska," said Rob Weaver, vice president for Enrollment and Student Financial Services. "On the coasts we get asked 'Where's Nebraska?' and we take every opportunity to tell them about 'The Good Life.'" Of Union's out-of-state students, more than one fifth choose to stay in Nebraska after graduation, contributing to the state's brain gain.

Union College put in place more stringent admissions standards last year and yet has continued its growth. All regularly admitted students must now have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 and an ACT score of 18. While these are not as high as elite universities, they are higher than most of the schools pulling from the same demographic of high school graduates as Union College. "Continuing to attract new students to our campus while simultaneously raising the admissions bar is really exciting," Weaver said.

"While we're delighted to reach this milestone, at Union we've always known that bigger isn't necessarily better," said Smith. "We are grateful for each student here and the opportunities each of them represent for Union and for Christ."

View a PDF file (3 megabytes) of the article in the Lincoln Journal-Star here.

Blake releases new book

Chris Blake, Union College English and communications professor, spent a semester on sabbatical last year to write. Pacific Press released his newest book in February, Swimming Against the Current: Living for the God You Love. It is a sequel to his book Searching for a God to Love, which has been translated into four languages.

Employee honored with The Lincoln Business Journal 40 Under 40 Award

Jacque Smith, Union College director of public relations, received The Lincoln Business Journal 40 Under 40 Award. The award, presented at a breakfast at the Cornhusker Hotel on June 1, celebrates the accomplishments of 40 Lincoln-area business owners, managers, entrepreneurs, and professional men and women under 40 years of age. Smith is the second Union College employee to accept the 40 Under 40 Award; accounting professor Lisa Forbes received the award in 2006.

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Union College hosts Heart Walk, celebrates National Employee Health and Fitness Day, Wednesday, May 16

As the population of the United States ages, heart disease, already the
nation's number one killer, will affect more people. The American Heart
Association is working to combat this growing crisis with a 10-year
strategic goal of reducing coronary heart disease, stroke and risk by 25
percent in 2010. The annual Heart Walk is one small way to help raise
funds and show solidarity with the fight against heart disease. For the
eighth year, Union College, in participation with the American Heart
Association, is hosting Lincoln's Alternate Day American Heart Walk.
Walkers may begin the one-mile walk around campus anytime between 11:30
a.m. and 1 p.m., rain or shine. Following the 15-20 minute walk, light
snacks will be provided.

Special guest Lauren Knoff, a six-year-old kindergarten girl born with a
heart birth defect, will be a participant at this year's Heart Walk.
Each year, 36,000 babies are born with heart defects, the third most
fatal form of birth defect. Knoff has survived to be an ambassador for
the American Heart Association. She and her schoolmates from Helen Hyatt
elementary will lead the walk.

The Heart Walk is just one of several events focusing on wellness for
National Employee Health and Fitness day. In the afternoon, Union
College employees will team up for games and activities followed by the
year-end employee party. Employee health is a priority for the campus;
Union College has earned the designation as a Silver Well Workplace
Award through WorkWell, the local branch for Wellness Councils of
America (WELCOA).

The Heart Walk is free to the public. Donations to the American Heart
Association are welcome but not required. To participate, meet under the
clock tower at the center of campus (3800 South 48th St., Lincoln).

Nebraska Commissioner of Education speaks for Union College graduation; first master's degrees granted

On Sunday, May 13, Union College awarded 199 associate, baccalaureate and for the first time, master's degrees during the annual commencement ceremony in the College View Seventh-day Adventist Church. The service recognized 20 graduates from December 2006, 119 May graduates and 46 prospective August graduates for a total of 185 graduates. Among this group, 13 students received two degrees and one student received three degrees. Six of the graduating seniors are Union Scholars, which involves advanced coursework and a research project.

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