Staff

Union College exceeds 1,000 students for first time in 24 years

LINCOLN—At 10:28 a.m. on the last day registration was open, Serhiy Horokhovskyy became Union College's 1,000th student of the 2007-2008 school year. A senior religion major from Ukraine, Horokhovskyy is the first student since 1983 to help Union College cross the 1000 enrollment mark. By the end of the close of registration on Tuesday, Aug. 28, Union College's official enrollment reached 1,015 students with a full time equivalence of 909.5.

To celebrate the 1,000-student milestone, Union College is invited all students and employees to a free lunch served on the campus Tribute Terrace. In addition to the meal and ice cream from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 28, festivities included a short program. Remarks and recognition of the Enrollment Services team by Union College President David Smith were followed by a college-wide sing-a-long of the well-loved school song, "Slinga de Ink." State Senator Tony Fulton joined in the festivities and added his congratulations and support.

"Students come to Union College for many reasons—caring campus family, a Christian atmosphere and for unique programs like international rescue and relief and physician assistant studies," President Smith said. "One thousand is just a number, but the fact that more and more students value Union's campus culture makes me proud of the students, faculty and staff who have invested themselves in Union."

Union's campus has become a home-away-from home for a diverse group of students from 49 states and 26 countries. Four out of five Union students are from outside of Nebraska, that's a higher percentage of non-resident students than any other college in the state.

"When we recruit new students for the college, we don't just sell Union, we sell Nebraska," said Rob Weaver, vice president for Enrollment and Student Financial Services. "On the coasts we get asked 'Where's Nebraska?' and we take every opportunity to tell them about 'The Good Life.'" Of Union's out-of-state students, more than one fifth choose to stay in Nebraska after graduation, contributing to the state's brain gain.

Union College put in place more stringent admissions standards last year and yet has continued its growth. All regularly admitted students must now have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 and an ACT score of 18. While these are not as high as elite universities, they are higher than most of the schools pulling from the same demographic of high school graduates as Union College. "Continuing to attract new students to our campus while simultaneously raising the admissions bar is really exciting," Weaver said.

"While we're delighted to reach this milestone, at Union we've always known that bigger isn't necessarily better," said Smith. "We are grateful for each student here and the opportunities each of them represent for Union and for Christ."

View a PDF file (3 megabytes) of the article in the Lincoln Journal-Star here.

Students launch VW for inspiration and fellowship

Nichole Scott, sophomore communication major, had considered going to VW several times, but was unsure what the program involved. Then a friend invited her to attend the VW meeting at which Tanya Cochran was the featured speaker. Seeing as Cochran is her boss, former teacher and friend, Scott decided to check it out.

"I wasn't sure what to expect and didn't know if I would like it" Scott said.

Mission to India and Nepal: learning to serve with adaptibility

The group of Union College faculty, students, and alumni traveled 10 hours by bus to enjoy sight-seeing at the Taj Mahal.

Employee honored with The Lincoln Business Journal 40 Under 40 Award

Jacque Smith, Union College director of public relations, received The Lincoln Business Journal 40 Under 40 Award. The award, presented at a breakfast at the Cornhusker Hotel on June 1, celebrates the accomplishments of 40 Lincoln-area business owners, managers, entrepreneurs, and professional men and women under 40 years of age. Smith is the second Union College employee to accept the 40 Under 40 Award; accounting professor Lisa Forbes received the award in 2006.

Union College hosts Heart Walk, celebrates National Employee Health and Fitness Day, Wednesday, May 16

As the population of the United States ages, heart disease, already the
nation's number one killer, will affect more people. The American Heart
Association is working to combat this growing crisis with a 10-year
strategic goal of reducing coronary heart disease, stroke and risk by 25
percent in 2010. The annual Heart Walk is one small way to help raise
funds and show solidarity with the fight against heart disease. For the
eighth year, Union College, in participation with the American Heart
Association, is hosting Lincoln's Alternate Day American Heart Walk.
Walkers may begin the one-mile walk around campus anytime between 11:30
a.m. and 1 p.m., rain or shine. Following the 15-20 minute walk, light
snacks will be provided.

Special guest Lauren Knoff, a six-year-old kindergarten girl born with a
heart birth defect, will be a participant at this year's Heart Walk.
Each year, 36,000 babies are born with heart defects, the third most
fatal form of birth defect. Knoff has survived to be an ambassador for
the American Heart Association. She and her schoolmates from Helen Hyatt
elementary will lead the walk.

The Heart Walk is just one of several events focusing on wellness for
National Employee Health and Fitness day. In the afternoon, Union
College employees will team up for games and activities followed by the
year-end employee party. Employee health is a priority for the campus;
Union College has earned the designation as a Silver Well Workplace
Award through WorkWell, the local branch for Wellness Councils of
America (WELCOA).

The Heart Walk is free to the public. Donations to the American Heart
Association are welcome but not required. To participate, meet under the
clock tower at the center of campus (3800 South 48th St., Lincoln).

International rescue and relief students assist with disaster relief in central Florida

International rescue and relief students from Union College in Lincoln, Neb., thought they had seen the worst winter rain storms Florida had to offer during two weeks of ocean survival and dive rescue training. But on Friday, Feb. 2, news of pre-dawn tornadoes a few hundred miles north of their training posts in the Florida Keys prompted 19 Union College students and staff members to find a way to help.

Multicultural Committee to celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr.'s legacy

Union College will not have classes Monday, Jan. 15 in memory of Martin Luther King, Jr. Union's Multicultural Committee encourages students, employees and the community to have "a day on, not just a day off."

Record-breaking Project Impact celebrates 25 years of community service

"Can we come back sometime and do more?" asked Matthew Johnson, senior chemistry major at Union College while repainting a group home. Questions like Johnson's echoed across the city as over 900 volunteers at more than 50 agencies celebrated the 25th anniversary of Project Impact, Union College's annual community service day. The spirit of volunteerism that has made the event a success since 1981 continues throughout the year. Students who want to do more build upon a legacy of community involvement.

Classes have begun

Lincoln—The stairwells of the Everett Dick Building once again reverberate with the sounds of reunions and students making new acquaintances. More stations are open in Union Market and the lines are a bit longer. Across campus, lost-looking new students get pointed in the right directions. The energy brought by the return of students can be felt everywhere on campus.

At Union College, school is back in session.

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