Students

Community invited as students end the year with music

As the academic year winds down, students often feel like singing. At Union, the months of April and May are filled with music as students showcase a year's worth of practice and learning.

All events are free and the community is invited to attend. Performances take place in the Engel Recital Hall (in Engel Hall on the corner of Bancroft Ave. and south 48th St.) unless otherwise noted.

Esther Baierl Senior Voice Recital
Sunday, April 13, 3:00 p.m.

Unionaires Spring Vespers Concert
Friday, April 18, 8:00 p.m.
College View Church

Concert Winds Spring Concert
Saturday, April 19, 8:45 p.m.
Union College Gymnasium

UC Chamber Orchestra Spring Concert
Sunday, April 20, 6:00 p.m.

Seth Dunkin Senior Recital
Sunday, April 27, 3:00 p.m.

General Student Recital
Tuesday, April 29 7:30 p.m.

Honors Piano Recital
Wednesday, April 30 7:30 p.m.

Unionaires "Concert at the Capitol"
Thursday, May 8, noon-1:00 p.m.
Nebraska State Capitol Rotunda

Naomi Bruette Junior Recital
Thursday, May 8, 7:00 p.m.
College View Church

Jordan Lang Senior Piano Recital
Thursday, May 8, 8:00 p.m.
College View Church

Erin Flanagan Senior Voice Recital
Saturday, May 10, 8:00 p.m.

Senior art exhibit "Under Construction" in McClelland Art Gallery

Until April 20, The McClelland Art Gallery windows are laced with yellow tape, touting CAUTION and CUDIDO in bold, black lettering. Yet the current display by Union College's Zak Adams, a senior graphic design major, is open and safe to the public for viewing.

Titled Under Construction, a sign just inside the door explains that, as a person, Adams is ever learning and hence continuously under construction. The theme also reflects one of his greatest passions, carpentry.

Some of my Best Friends are Smiths to be performed by Union College Drama

Performances

Thursday

March 27

7 p.m.

Saturday

March 29

8:30 p.m.

Saturday

April 5

9 p.m.

Union College Drama presents Some of My Best Friends are Smiths, a one-act play by David Compton, directed by Mary Christian, senior English major as a part of her Play Direction class. In the play, Miss Jones and Miss Smith arrive at a quaint English country hotel after a long day's journey only to be told that the hotel does not accept Smiths! The ensuing argument calls on the two travelers, as well as on the audience, to reflect on how prejudice begins and how it should be dealt with.

The play will be performed in Woods Auditorium on the campus of Union College, 3800 South 48th Street. Enter campus from Bancroft Avenue. Tickets will be on sale in the bookstore beginning Monday afternoon, March 24 and at the door (cash or check only please). Tickets cost $4 for students and senior citizens and $6 for adults.

About the cast

Sarah Bartzatt (Shirley Robinson) has played Minnie May in a high school production of Hello Dolly, and last year she appeared as Mrs. Corbin in The Boys Next Door. A sophomore elementary education and native Lincolnite, Sarah enjoys playing the piano and hanging out at Disney World.

Julia Dickman's (Molly Jones) life is a stage, she says, but Smiths is her first venture onto a stage of any other kind. When not saving the world as a senior international rescue and relief major, she loves to cook, rappel, and go water tubing. Julia hails from Savannah, Tenn.

Tori Hudgins (Dora Smith) is a hard-core nerd from Columbia, MD. A freshman double-majoring in mathematics and math education, she lists solving cool math problems as one of her favorite hobbies. She shares Miss Smith's love of backpacking and enjoys music, reading, and scrapbooking. Her past dramatic roles include Cecily in The Importance of Being Earnest, Mrs. Hopkins in My Fair Lady, and Belle in Beauty and the Beast.

Rebeca Salcedo (Mrs. Blake), a senior majoring in journalism and Spanish, comes from Baton Rouge, LA. In her spare time (hahaha), this new actress and long-time drama queen likes to sing, play the piano, read, swim, and go for bike rides.

Sadie Wren (Miss Brown), a sophomore language arts education major who calls Lincoln home, is making her theatrical debut in this production. Her favorite activities include volleyball and swimming.

Mary Christian (director) is a senior English and French major from Hamburg, PA. By way of past theatrical involvement, she has acted in Everyman, Maid to Order, and The Sound of Music and stage managed The Boys Next Door. Nonsense poetry, homemade bread, crochet, and traveling are a few of her favorite things.

Union College Drama to present The Eumenides

Performances

Thursday

Feb. 28

New student government leadership chosen

This past week students at Union College elected their student leaders for the 2008-2009 school year. In total, 365 people voted in the election. Next year's ASB executive team is:

President – Alicia Archer
Executive Vice President – Kelly Vogler
Financial Vice President – Sabrina Wessels
Social Vice President – Sadie Wren

Congratulations to the winners, and thank you to all those who ran!

Senior Claudia Pech demonstrates range in art exhibit

Beginning Feb. 17, The McClelland Art Gallery will showcase the works of Claudia Pech, senior communication and graphic design major.

"It's just for fun," Pech explained. "Most of the senior exhibits I've seen are a mix of graphic design and fine arts. I didn't want to take away from my graphic design major so I decided to have two exhibits."

In her first show titled "Random Thinkings," there will be at least 16 of her fine arts pieces ranging from watercolors, oil paintings, charcoal drawings to a few photographs.

As a young girl, Pech planned on becoming an artist in Paris. Life soon got in the way and disrupted her aspirations. While in college, however, her dreams resurfaced and partially revitalized as she took every art class available at Union.

"Art moves something within me," Pech said, "I hope my creations make people wonder, think or remember—at least give them a different perspective."

The McClelland Art Gallery is in the Ortner Center on the Union College campus, 3800 S. 48th Street. Enter the campus from Prescott Avenue. The art gallery is free to the public and open daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, contact the Ortner Center at 402.486.2545.

Union College receives President's Honor Roll Award for Service

Specialized Career Fair at Union College proves significant success

On Feb. 6, 2008, Union College's Going Global Career Fair brought recruiters and presenters from 20 organizations to the Don Love Building. From big names such the Peace Corps to the less well-known Active Community Team Services (ACTS), the information available to the attending students was invaluable.

"I think this career fair is a great idea and helps a lot of people," said Jeremy Jones, sophomore international rescue and relief major.

Although only 100-120 actually registered for the event, Doug Tallman, IRR associate director, noted that more likely 150-160 students, as well as some faculty, came to browse and meet recruiters.

"I made more meaningful and intelligent contacts in two hours than I've seen in two days," commented Fred Ramsey from Re-Creation Unlimited who said he has done similar fairs at other campuses. "I was impressed. Union's event was the most successful compared to the other Seventh-day Adventist campus I have visited."

Since the IRR program is relatively new, many students have a difficult time figuring out how best to utilize the skills they're learning. Tallman explained how this career fair targeted these students.

"I think IRR majors benefit the most from the fair as far as putting them on a career path that goes with their major." Jones stated, "But, I think everyone can find something that's applicable to them."

Plans are already being made to repeat the success of the Going Global Career Fair next year. Meghan Weese, a graduate assistant for the Outdoor Education Center at Southern Adventist University, encouraged students to attend the event. "The biggest mistake would be not coming," she said.

"Don't forget me:" Union students evangelize in Borneo

Amy Agosto and friends.

Amy Agosto (shown fifth from left), sophomore international rescue and relief major, spoke about Jesus to children ages 12 to 18 while in Borneo for two weeks this summer. Three of them chose to be baptized.

Elique Semaboye (center, back) met an Indonesian movie star while in Borneo. The young man attended Semaboye's talks each night and ultimately gave his life to Christ.

Amy, Dana and friends.

Amy Agosto and Dana Connell, center, traveled to Borneo to speak in an evangelistic series in the city of Balikpapan. Each experienced God's hand in their preaching and cherishes the relationships they built with local young people.

Just before Dana Connell stepped aboard the plane that would take her back home—half-way around the world—a 15-year old Indonesian girl pressed a school photo I.D. card and a hair clip into Dana's hand. "Don't forget me. Don't forget me," she whispered over and over. The young girl, her parents and her two sisters had bonded with Connell through her summer evangelistic work in Borneo. Upon meeting the youngest girl, Connell sent a note with well wishes to the oldest daughter, who had just undergone thyroid surgery. After Connell's note, the whole family attended her meetings; the girls' mother had never come to church before, in spite of nine years of visits by local Adventist church members. "When I left, all three girls and their mother missed school to say goodbye to me at the airport," Connell says. "All of this bloomed from a seemingly insignificant get-well note. God taught me the impact small, outwardly-insignificant acts can have."

Connell, who graduated in May with a degree in theology, was part of a group of six Union College students, led by Professor of Religion Tom Shepherd, who traveled to Borneo July 13-28. They held evangelistic meetings in the city of Balikpapan in the East Kalimantan district of Borneo, an island in southeast Asia. "Borneo was a place where I could see that the gospel actually meant something to people," Connell said. "I wanted to see people get excited about the power of knowing Jesus." The southern and eastern portions of Borneo, which sits southwest of the Philippines, are part of Indonesia, the largest Muslim nation in the world. "When we arrived in Balikpapan after two days of travel we were overwhelmed with the friendly welcome we received," Shepherd said. "A large group of church members came to greet us at the airport. They welcomed us in their churches provided many meals for our team and were gracious hosts."

Each student was assigned a different site and delivered 19 sermons in 16 days. Their Bible presentations were held in rented halls or churches throughout Balikpapan and the surrounding area. "The program was pretty intensive," said Shepherd who led a similar project in Rwanda two years ago.

Elique Semaboye, a sophomore from [trying to get his home country] Africa, held meetings in a rural area outside of Balikpapan. As a theology major, his work in Borneo was a valuable experience for his future as a pastor. He regularly spoke to 75 to 100 visitors in attendance, including four local ministers of another denomination who sat on the front row taking notes. One evening one of these pastors came up to Semaboye after his sermon, encouraging him by saying, "Thank you for telling us the truth." An Indonesian movie star named Johannes also regularly attended Semaboye's evangelistic programs; the two young men soon became friends. One evening after the meeting Johannes took Semaboye aside said that he had been very inspired by Semaboye's sermons. He wanted Semaboye to pray that he would have the strength to give up being a movie star and follow Jesus.

Amy Agosto, a sophomore international rescue and relief major, held meetings for children ages 12 to 18 at the local Adventist school. Many of them were not Christians, and she felt especially called to reach those who had never heard about Jesus before. "The kids were so inspiring to me," said Agosto, who had a fear of public speaking before she began preaching at the meetings. "The little ones were always so cheerful and I could tell they really loved Jesus. Speaking to them helped me to slowly become more comfortable speaking up front."

Agosto also had the opportunity to interact with a young man who is passionate about following Jesus. One of the attendees at her meetings for children was a 17-year-old named Timothy. He was responsible for the program's music, sound system, and anything else he was needed for. Agosto soon noticed that Timothy, a high school senior, was wise beyond his years. He told her, "Amy, I believe that the young people will finish this great work that God has put us to do." Agosto couldn't agree with Timothy more. "We young people have a work to do as a light to this world," she says. "God is preparing young people around the world to be his tools, bringing the gospel to every nation. I am so excited to be an instrument for God."

At the close of the evangelistic trip the group held a mass meeting with all the sites combined at one location; 45 people were baptized. "It is so rewarding to see people respond to the Gospel," Shepherd said. Among those baptized were three of the children Agosto had preached to and interacted with during her evangelistic outreach. "My time in Borneo helped me to depend on God a lot more. I know that God used my preaching to place a seed in the hearts of those kids."

Parent's weekend photos 2007

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