Students

250 students join Union College to "Sing for Peace"

Wednesday, Jan. 30 marks the beginning of Mid-America Union's 55th annual Music Festival, themed "Sing for Peace – Long Live Love". Both choral and keyboard students are featured this year with several guest directors, headed by Union College professors Dr. Daniel Lynn and Dr. Ryan Wells. In addition, Dr. Gerald Holbrook, a nationally recognized expert in Monophonic Gregorian chant, and Oscar Harriott, a local gospel music expert, will aid with the music clinics.

Union College will host 250 students from 12 Adventist high schools. Though most hail from the Midwest, participanting schools will come from as far away as New York and Utah. The most gifted and skilled students from each institution are invited to Music Festival to expand their melodic horizons.

"The festival is a unique opportunity for the talented music students to all come together and create music," Dr. Lynn explained. "I'm excited about working with these talented students and having them experience great music."

With 14-hours of rehearsal, the combined effort of the directors, visitors and Union's own choral performaers will culminate in two performances open to the community.

Headline concerts are Friday, Feb. 1 at 7:30 p.m. and Sabbath, Feb. 2 at 4:15 p.m. Both concerts are in the College View Church, 48th and Prescott, and are free and open to the public. Additionally, a piano recital featuring an elite group of visiting student pianists is scheduled for Friday afternoon at 1:30 p.m. in the Engel Recital Hall. Contact the Division of Fine Arts at 402.486.2553 for more information.

Communication class organizes benefit concert for Invisible Children

Union College communication students are putting textbook tactics into practice by organizing a benefit concert for Invisible Children on Sunday, Feb. 10 at 7:30 p.m. The concert will take place at the College View Seventh-day Adventist Church (South 48th St. and Prescott Ave.)

Invisible Children is a nonprofit organization established in 2003 to help the homeless and orphaned children of Uganda. More than 20 years of civil conflict in the country has created a need for educational and economic opportunities among Ugandan youth that Invisible Children hopes to address.

McClelland Art Gallery displays work by photography students

LINCOLN— An array of 30 photographs debuted in the McClelland Art Gallery on Sunday, Dec. 9 at 7:30 p.m. Students from the photography class taught by Bruce Forbes are displaying three of their best pictures taken during the course. The diversity of the students' personalities is evident in the exhibit, ranging from digital camera work to film, and black and white to color.

Senior display "Unlike the Rest" at McClelland Art Gallery

LINCOLN—Running until Dec. 8 in the McClelland Art Gallery, "Unlike the Rest" is titled appropriately. Union College senior Josh Morris named each of the 40 pieces on display after rock songs. During the debut, some of the songs played in the background adding to the ambiance.

Although unintentional, each gallery section of Morris' senior exhibit reflects a small part of his personality. The fine art pieces display his cheekiness and humor; the photography gives a peek into his calm, easy going manner; and the photo-shopped work shows his edgy and outgoing side.

McClelland Art Gallery displays diverse pottery

Diversity produces much of the beauty found on campus at Union College. Running until Nov. 4, the eclectic pottery exhibit includes three artists: Jovannah Poor Bear, sophomore elementary education major; Kimmy Wills, junior biology major; and Bruce Forbes, associate professor of art. The trio of artists bring a wide range of style and technique to the McClelland Art Gallery.

Student photography on display in the McClelland Art Gallery

Volunteers impact Lincoln Thursday, Sept. 6

Ann Bryant, Union College student chaplain and junior business major, gets excited when her peers have big ideas. "I want to start a tutoring program for refugees and immigrants in Lincoln who don't speak English," said senior Katie Carlson when she came to see Bryant in Campus Ministries recently. "And I want to kick it off during Project Impact next week."

Never mind the short notice, Bryant gave the idea an enthusiastic go-ahead. "We'll do it. How can we help you make this happen?" Bryant said.

Union College exceeds 1,000 students for first time in 24 years

LINCOLN—At 10:28 a.m. on the last day registration was open, Serhiy Horokhovskyy became Union College's 1,000th student of the 2007-2008 school year. A senior religion major from Ukraine, Horokhovskyy is the first student since 1983 to help Union College cross the 1000 enrollment mark. By the end of the close of registration on Tuesday, Aug. 28, Union College's official enrollment reached 1,015 students with a full time equivalence of 909.5.

To celebrate the 1,000-student milestone, Union College is invited all students and employees to a free lunch served on the campus Tribute Terrace. In addition to the meal and ice cream from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 28, festivities included a short program. Remarks and recognition of the Enrollment Services team by Union College President David Smith were followed by a college-wide sing-a-long of the well-loved school song, "Slinga de Ink." State Senator Tony Fulton joined in the festivities and added his congratulations and support.

"Students come to Union College for many reasons—caring campus family, a Christian atmosphere and for unique programs like international rescue and relief and physician assistant studies," President Smith said. "One thousand is just a number, but the fact that more and more students value Union's campus culture makes me proud of the students, faculty and staff who have invested themselves in Union."

Union's campus has become a home-away-from home for a diverse group of students from 49 states and 26 countries. Four out of five Union students are from outside of Nebraska, that's a higher percentage of non-resident students than any other college in the state.

"When we recruit new students for the college, we don't just sell Union, we sell Nebraska," said Rob Weaver, vice president for Enrollment and Student Financial Services. "On the coasts we get asked 'Where's Nebraska?' and we take every opportunity to tell them about 'The Good Life.'" Of Union's out-of-state students, more than one fifth choose to stay in Nebraska after graduation, contributing to the state's brain gain.

Union College put in place more stringent admissions standards last year and yet has continued its growth. All regularly admitted students must now have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 and an ACT score of 18. While these are not as high as elite universities, they are higher than most of the schools pulling from the same demographic of high school graduates as Union College. "Continuing to attract new students to our campus while simultaneously raising the admissions bar is really exciting," Weaver said.

"While we're delighted to reach this milestone, at Union we've always known that bigger isn't necessarily better," said Smith. "We are grateful for each student here and the opportunities each of them represent for Union and for Christ."

View a PDF file (3 megabytes) of the article in the Lincoln Journal-Star here.

Students launch VW for inspiration and fellowship

Nichole Scott, sophomore communication major, had considered going to VW several times, but was unsure what the program involved. Then a friend invited her to attend the VW meeting at which Tanya Cochran was the featured speaker. Seeing as Cochran is her boss, former teacher and friend, Scott decided to check it out.

"I wasn't sure what to expect and didn't know if I would like it" Scott said.

First Book receives grant

CORDmagazine online feature: return to CORD

Spreading literacy is the key reason Joann Herrington, associate professor of education, founded Union's local arm of First Book, an international nonprofit organization that gives new books to low income families. Started in 2004, First Book-Union College has distributed thousands of books to local elementary schools and community centers.

Recently, senior teacher candidates from Union's Education department, coordinated a grant proposal resulting in $500 from Verizon Youth Services. With these funds, the literacy advocates celebrated International Book Day at a local elementary school. The party highlighted Asian culture and featured games, books, food and crafts.

"This was a valuable experience for our teacher candidates," Herrington said. "The elementary kids had a ball at Union's First Book event."

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