Small School. Big Impact.

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Experience the thrill of service

College shouldn't be about waiting four years to start doing what you're passionate about. You'll feel it during Project Impact at the start of the year; service is integrated into everything we do. Union students make a difference immediately. 

Classes that serve the community:

  • Business majors help low-income families with their taxes. 
  • Education majors start working with kids their freshman year. 
  • Communication majors build websites and social media strategies for non-profits. 
  • Nursing majors put on foot clinics to the local homeless shelter.
  • IRR majors that team up with Red Cross
  • Social work majors take a break from the classroom to get involved in the community with practicum experiences and volunteering opportunities that provide direct contact and training with real colleagues and clients.

Whatever your major, you will find ways use it for the greater good at Union College.

Check out how our alumni are using what they’ve learned to impact the world. Click here.

Putting the caring in health care

Union PAs gain a global perspective through a yearly mission trip.

“It broke our hearts because there was nothing else we could do,” said Nicole Samila, a Union College physician assistant student. “We discovered this woman’s husband had left her and she was raising her three children as a single mother.”

Video: Project Impact 2016

Project Impact 2016

Union College kicks off every school year with Project Impact—a day off from classes to serve the Lincoln Community. This year we followed Ashley Bower and a group of freshmen as they experienced Project Impact for the first time.

Learn more at www.ucollege.edu/campusm

How to save a life

IRR students don’t just learn how to save lives—they actually do it.

The other side of the law

All it took was one ride along with a Lincoln police officer and Arcelia Gomez was hooked. Now after a series of mentorships and internships, the senior social work major found a job in the Lincoln Police Department supporting crime victims.

Two PA students published in scholarly journals

For most Union College PA students, their capstone project—similar to a master’s thesis—ends with a presentation to the PA faculty, staff, and their fellow students. But for Tamara Dietze and Ashley Waldrep, their capstone projects lived on when they were recently published in scholarly peer-reviewed journals.

Halley receives 40 Under 40 award from Nebraska Action Coalition

Jackie Halley, an assistant professor in Union College’s nursing program, was recently recognized as one of the 40 Under 40, an award from the Nebraska Action Coalition honoring 40 emerging Nebraska nursing leaders under the age of 40. Halley accepted the award at a celebration of nurse leaders held in Union College’s Woods Auditorium on September 16.

Union College Singers to perform at Adventist leadership meetings

The Union College Singers will perform for the annual Year-End Meetings of the North American Division—the organization tasked with guiding the work of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in North America.

Get ready for Project Impact 2016

“Project Impact is a day where we take time to serve others,” said Canain Ming, a junior Union English Education student and coordinator for Project Impact 2015 and 2016. “Our dream is for every student to have an opportunity to serve someone else. Project Impact is the catalyst and we hope to return to these organizations and continue to serve all year long.”

Connecting in Cambodia

“What am I going to do with my life?”

Meredith Nichols was definitely not the first high school senior to ask that question. She thought she had everything planned out. A soccer star in her small north Texas hometown, Nichols planned to play at a university in New York.

But an ACL tear brought her plans to screeching halt. “I was super lost,” she remembered. ”Sports where a huge part of my life, but I know now that my priorities weren’t straight.”

Teaching patients to battle HIV

“People don’t think HIV is a problem anymore,” said Sampath Wijesinghe. “In the 1980s many people were dying from it and everyone was talking about it, but now that we have great treatments and it’s no longer a death sentence young people don’t even hear about it anymore.”

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