CORD Online Feature

Sailing to recovery

Everything changed when he met Caelestis. The 65-foot custom cutter-rigged sloop cost Matt Satterlee ’94 everything, but has gained him much more.

Fighting a Forbidden Foe

Most everyone had long since gone home, but a small group still pressed around him, asking questions, desperate for answers. When I. Jon Russell ’65, M.D., Ph.D., American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Master, visited Union College in April 2011, nearly 600 Lincoln residents gathered to hear him talk about advances in treatment for fibromyalgia, a disorder often marginalized by the medical community.

Finding the healing powers of foods

Vicki Schlegel ’84 is passionate about food—but she’s not looking for the next secret sauce featured on the Food Network or 13 exquisite ways cook a potato. As an associate professor at the University of Nebraska Food Science and Technology Department, she heads a research team working to uncover the hidden healing powers of food—a journey that began in Jorgensen Hall more than 30 years ago.

Summer 2006 Issue of CORDmagazine

Winter 2006/07 Issue of CORDmagazine

Winter 2007/08 Issue of CORDmagazine

Summer 2007 Issue of CORDmagazine

Summer/Fall 2008 Issue of CORDmagazine

Download a PDF here, or view articles below.

Union College extends welcome to visiting students

Gymfest

Saturday night, Oct. 13, an audience gathered to enjoy a gymnastic performance hosted by Union College. It was the grand finale to training clinics hosted by Union College with cooperation from University of Nebraska—Lincoln for about 150 academy and middle school students from the Dakotas, Missouri, Colorado and Nebraska. The evening was jump-started by an exhibition of ring skills and tumbling from members of the gymnastic team from UNL.

"It was amazing to be able to see people do flips like that," said Union student Kara McDaniel.

Outside of UNL's special performance, each visiting school as well as Union College's Gymnaires performed solo routines followed by a presentation from the entire group.

"The performance on Saturday was such a success!" Gymnaires' Courtney Haavisto said. "Everyone did great on their routines. It felt so awesome to see some of the moves performed that we helped [the kids] with." Union students, such as sophomore Savannah Bower, were surprised with how agile and flexible the athletes were.

"I wish my body could move like that," she commented.

"We have talented people on the team," Stephanie Eldenburg, a longtime gymnast, said. "We have a lot of potential."

That talent is mirrored in the new head coach, Seth Perkins, who organized the event.

"I think he has a lot of talent to share with the kids." McDaniel said. Eldenburg said Perkins is good at remaining calm and in control during a hectic weekend.

The success of the performance wasn't simply due to the coaches, supportive crowd or fluidity of the show, but also in the impact that it left with the visiting students who stayed with kind hosts in Rees, Prescott and Culver Halls.

"From watching the students and faculty, the other gymnasts seemed really welcome," Bower said. "But that's how the entire atmosphere here is at Union."

Next school year, Union will take its turn hosting Acrofest, a similar but larger training clinic open to gymnastics teams from all colleges and high schools in the North American Division of Seventh-day Adventists.

Volleyball Tournament

Two weeks following Gymfest, another host of visitors were able to attest to Union's hospitality. The weekend of Oct. 26 brought eight teams of girls from across the Midwest to compete against each other in a volleyball tournament. The winners were Midland Academy (Kans.), College View Academy (Neb.), and Campion Academy (Colo.).

"We're really excited about the three new teams from Maplewood, Minnetonka and Dakota Adventist Academy," said Ric Spaulding, athletic director for Union College. "More girls playing on volleyball teams in the Mid-America Union means that's more girls hopefully coming to play at Union College."

Although the visitors, such as senior Molly Gibb, believed that the athletics "were handled well," the accommodations and friendliness of the students were commented on the most.

"This year we tried something new," Spaulding said about feeding the 135 visitors. "We put barcodes on the name tags." Everything ran smoothly, and the new dining system will probably be implemented for future tournaments.

Kayla Rouse, who not only came to the recent Gymfest, but also basketball tournaments for the past three years, stays with girls that she already knows. She thinks Union is very open and welcoming.

"Girls just say 'hi' or open doors," Rouse said on feeling welcomed. "It's not something big, but it just shows that they want you on campus."

Even though Sunnydale sophomore Kristi Fitzpatrick's sister attends Union, Kristi had never been inside any of the buildings until she came for this year's tournament.

"It was a little awkward at first," Fitzpatrick admitted, as she hadn't met her sister's roommate before. "But then it was OK. My sister introduced me to a lot of people." Gibb, Fitzpatrick's teammate, used to be against attending Union College, but with each visit, she becomes more open to the idea.

"Every year keeps getting better and I get more excited about going to college," Gibb said. "Union College seems to offer a lot of opportunities. Everyone is really outgoing and nice. The staff seems really energetic and willing to help the students."

"I think people are nice here," Fitzpatrick agreed. "They just seem friendly. I'll probably end up going here because, after being here, everybody is so friendly. The other colleges seemed really different."

"It's not just our [athletics] department." Spaulding said. "The dorms, students here, Union Market, Ortner Center – there are a lot of different areas working together to make it work."

For team photos from the volleyball tournament, visit Union's athletics site.

"Don't forget me:" Union students evangelize in Borneo

Amy Agosto and friends.

Amy Agosto (shown fifth from left), sophomore international rescue and relief major, spoke about Jesus to children ages 12 to 18 while in Borneo for two weeks this summer. Three of them chose to be baptized.

Elique Semaboye (center, back) met an Indonesian movie star while in Borneo. The young man attended Semaboye's talks each night and ultimately gave his life to Christ.

Amy, Dana and friends.

Amy Agosto and Dana Connell, center, traveled to Borneo to speak in an evangelistic series in the city of Balikpapan. Each experienced God's hand in their preaching and cherishes the relationships they built with local young people.

Just before Dana Connell stepped aboard the plane that would take her back home—half-way around the world—a 15-year old Indonesian girl pressed a school photo I.D. card and a hair clip into Dana's hand. "Don't forget me. Don't forget me," she whispered over and over. The young girl, her parents and her two sisters had bonded with Connell through her summer evangelistic work in Borneo. Upon meeting the youngest girl, Connell sent a note with well wishes to the oldest daughter, who had just undergone thyroid surgery. After Connell's note, the whole family attended her meetings; the girls' mother had never come to church before, in spite of nine years of visits by local Adventist church members. "When I left, all three girls and their mother missed school to say goodbye to me at the airport," Connell says. "All of this bloomed from a seemingly insignificant get-well note. God taught me the impact small, outwardly-insignificant acts can have."

Connell, who graduated in May with a degree in theology, was part of a group of six Union College students, led by Professor of Religion Tom Shepherd, who traveled to Borneo July 13-28. They held evangelistic meetings in the city of Balikpapan in the East Kalimantan district of Borneo, an island in southeast Asia. "Borneo was a place where I could see that the gospel actually meant something to people," Connell said. "I wanted to see people get excited about the power of knowing Jesus." The southern and eastern portions of Borneo, which sits southwest of the Philippines, are part of Indonesia, the largest Muslim nation in the world. "When we arrived in Balikpapan after two days of travel we were overwhelmed with the friendly welcome we received," Shepherd said. "A large group of church members came to greet us at the airport. They welcomed us in their churches provided many meals for our team and were gracious hosts."

Each student was assigned a different site and delivered 19 sermons in 16 days. Their Bible presentations were held in rented halls or churches throughout Balikpapan and the surrounding area. "The program was pretty intensive," said Shepherd who led a similar project in Rwanda two years ago.

Elique Semaboye, a sophomore from [trying to get his home country] Africa, held meetings in a rural area outside of Balikpapan. As a theology major, his work in Borneo was a valuable experience for his future as a pastor. He regularly spoke to 75 to 100 visitors in attendance, including four local ministers of another denomination who sat on the front row taking notes. One evening one of these pastors came up to Semaboye after his sermon, encouraging him by saying, "Thank you for telling us the truth." An Indonesian movie star named Johannes also regularly attended Semaboye's evangelistic programs; the two young men soon became friends. One evening after the meeting Johannes took Semaboye aside said that he had been very inspired by Semaboye's sermons. He wanted Semaboye to pray that he would have the strength to give up being a movie star and follow Jesus.

Amy Agosto, a sophomore international rescue and relief major, held meetings for children ages 12 to 18 at the local Adventist school. Many of them were not Christians, and she felt especially called to reach those who had never heard about Jesus before. "The kids were so inspiring to me," said Agosto, who had a fear of public speaking before she began preaching at the meetings. "The little ones were always so cheerful and I could tell they really loved Jesus. Speaking to them helped me to slowly become more comfortable speaking up front."

Agosto also had the opportunity to interact with a young man who is passionate about following Jesus. One of the attendees at her meetings for children was a 17-year-old named Timothy. He was responsible for the program's music, sound system, and anything else he was needed for. Agosto soon noticed that Timothy, a high school senior, was wise beyond his years. He told her, "Amy, I believe that the young people will finish this great work that God has put us to do." Agosto couldn't agree with Timothy more. "We young people have a work to do as a light to this world," she says. "God is preparing young people around the world to be his tools, bringing the gospel to every nation. I am so excited to be an instrument for God."

At the close of the evangelistic trip the group held a mass meeting with all the sites combined at one location; 45 people were baptized. "It is so rewarding to see people respond to the Gospel," Shepherd said. Among those baptized were three of the children Agosto had preached to and interacted with during her evangelistic outreach. "My time in Borneo helped me to depend on God a lot more. I know that God used my preaching to place a seed in the hearts of those kids."

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