Events

View a schedule of upcoming musical performances

The Division of Fine Arts are presenting the following musical performances:

Fall Chamber Music Concert
Nov. 10, 7:30 p.m.

Engel Recital Hall
48th & Bancroft

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Union College hosts gymnastics showcase

Don't be alarmed if you see youth hoisting each other onto shoulders or walking down a sidewalk on their hands--they are gymnasts, and they will be invading Lincoln Nov. 12-15.

Union College presents Freedom Writers' Erin Gruwell

Erin GruwellErin Gruwell, co-author of The Freedom Writers, will be speaking at 8:30 p.m., Nov. 13, at the Seventh-day Adventist College View Church, 4801 Prescott Ave., Lincoln, Neb.

Union College hosts international educators


Union College students Cori Piel and Matt Evens speak with administrators from other countries at the Phi Delta Kappa dinner.

Students organize memorial to victims of domestic violence

Domestic violence is a war that goes on behind closed doors and causes 2,000 to 4,000 casualties each year in the United States. The American Medical Association states that one in every three women will experience violence from a husband of boyfriend.

Children of the World performance brings more than culture

Joining voices from around the globe, the Children of the World choir will bring their program to the College View Seventh-day Adventist Church at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 19.

Union College invites community to hear Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow

Union College Division of Business and Computer Science welcomes Raichelle "Rai" H. Glover as a Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow Sept. 8-12. Glover, an accomplished executive, motivational speaker, leadership coach and civic volunteer, navigated corporate America as a Christian business woman in her fast-climbing career with Bank of America.

According to Barry Forbes, chair of Union College Division of Business and Computer Science, when funding became available through division's Advisory Board to host a visiting fellow, the group had many intriguing leaders to choose from. The division chose Glover because of her wealth of her experiences and connections between her areas of expertise and Union's learning environment.

"Topics such as 'liberal arts paths to corporate leadership' and 'what corporate diversity means today' are extremely relevant to Union College students," Forbes said. "Rai Glover's experience with work/family balance and strong civic engagement as shown by her many awards exemplify qualities that are important to this generation. We are honored that she accepted our invitation to spend the week with our students."

In her first book release (2007), Corporate to Kindergarten, Rai shares her personal weekly diary of the joys and struggles she faced while being a mom to a kindergartner and managing a thriving corporate career.

While on campus, Glover will be a guest speaker in six classes: Business Communications, Financial Institutions and Markets, Quality Management, Dynamics of Business, Conflict Management, and Nursing Management and Leadership. She will also present for the following free events that are open to the public:

Weekly Campus Chapel
"How to be a Christian in the Business World"
Tuesday, Sept. 9, 10:30 a.m.
College View Seventh-day Adventist Church
4801 Prescott Avenue

Union College Business Awareness Series
"Essential traits of successful leaders"
Wednesday, Sept. 10, 7 p.m.
Everett Dick Administration Building (amphitheatre, lower level)
Located at the center of the Union College campus—3800 S. 48th St.

Academic Convocation
"Benefits of a liberal arts background in becoming a corporate leader"
Thursday, Sept. 11, 10:30 a.m.
Everett Dick Administration Building (amphitheatre, lower level)
Located at the center of the Union College campus--3800 S. 48th St.

For more information about these events, contact Union College Division of Business and Computer Science: 486-2521.

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Project Impact kicks off a year of volunteering

Students always want more of three resources: time, money and sleep. So when Union College students are given a day free of classes and other on-campus commitments, it may seem counter-intuitive that 85 percent choose to show up at 8:15 a.m. to spend the day working--for free. But students make up for what they lack with an excess of enthusiasm and altruism. On Thursday, Sept. 4, Union students will once again commit their time and energy to serving the Lincoln community.

"I think everybody wants to help others," said Sara Baptist, sophomore communication major from Canon City, Colo. "When something presents itself like Project Impact, we jump on it. If Union held it more often, people would still go."

Began in 1981, Project Impact has given students the opportunity to change their corner of the world wile establishing lasting connections within the community. An estimated 15,100 volunteers have impacted Lincoln with more than 99,000 hours of voluntary labor since its inception. According to available research, it's the longest running collegiate service day with the highest percentage of participation in the nation.

There's no brownie points, no extra credit--nothing to motivate the mass of students to join the cause other than satisfaction and a free t-shirt. Whether it's raking leaves, painting shelters, serving up soup or helping build a house, Union College students and faculty turn out to do whatever sweaty, grimy work needs to be accomplished for those in need.

Building on the students' energy and 27 years of success, Ann Bryant, senior business administration major and Project Impact coordinator, sees the event as a way for students to connect with agencies they can serve all year. This will be the fourth year Union's women's basketball team will spend the day helping at the Lincoln Children's Museum, a relationship that has grown as the players return throughout the year to help with events.

"I like volunteering. I feel it's important," Baptist said. "It's not easy for kids to just say 'I'm going to volunteer this weekend.'" Students like Baptist can find ways to do more by talking to Union's student volunteer coordinator, Kaylea Blackburn, sophomore international rescue and relief major from Summersville, Mo., or read about a different volunteer opportunity highlighted each week in the Clocktower, Union's student newspaper.

Bryant, now in her third year of planning Project Impact, sees this year's event as a learning experience for her peers. "Of all the pressures you would think could keep students from volunteering--homework, class, extracurricular activities, the price of gas, whatever--the biggest barrier is awareness," Bryant said. "I've learned that the more people I involve in the planning process of this event, the more people understand the purpose of Project Impact and then are able to take on that passion themselves."

Fortenberry speaks at Union College Physician Assistant Hooding Ceremony

Congressman Jeff Fortenberry delivered the keynote address as the Physician Assistant Program of Union College's Division of Health Sciences began a new tradition: graduate hooding. This is the second year since the program finished transitioning from offering a baccalaureate degree to conferring a Master of Physician Assistant Studies and the first year it has held a hooding ceremony.

The ceremony took place on Friday, May 9, in the Ridnour Room of The Apothecary in Lincoln's Haymarket from 4:30 to 7 p.m.

"We are glad Congressman Fortenberry agreed to deliver the keynote," said Jeff Joiner, chair of the Division of Health Sciences. "Health care and politics are increasingly intertwined, and professionals and policy makers should take every opportunity to understand each other."

During the ceremony, established members of the profession gave the 22 students hoods to be worn as part of their regalia. "Hooding is a common tradition in health science graduate programs," said Joiner. "It's a great opportunity for us to say 'goodbye' to our students and welcome them as colleagues."

"Colleagues" is a particularly apt term for this class. According to Mike Huckabee, physician assistant program director, a higher number of students have firm offers of post-graduation employment than ever before.

"We're seeing unprecedented demand for our graduates," said Huckabee. It's no wonder, considering the physician assistant profession was rated in the April issue of Money Magazine as number five of the top ten best careers during an economic downturn.

The hooding also celebrated the end of the program's ninth year of existence and marked the beginning of a decade of service. "We have a lot to be thankful for this year," Huckabee said. "We're particularly grateful for grants from the Nebraska Academy of Physician Assistants and the National Physician Assistant Foundation that have allowed Union's PA and nursing programs to continue providing free foot care to the homeless of Lincoln."

Warriors banquet honors athletes

More than 75 Union College students, employees and guests attended the first annual Sports Awards Dinner on Sunday, April 20, 2008. Emceed by Brendan Nieto, senior business administration major, and Ross Eichele, senior business administration and computer information systems major, the evening included a catered dinner, an inspirational talk by former Warrior Aaron Purkeypile and a presentation of awards.

"This is the first year we've had an end-of-year event that recognized achievements by all those who participate in sports at Union," said Greg Steiner, intramurals director and women's basketball head coach. "In the past, the varsity athletes have celebrated with a dinner, but we felt it was important to hold a more inclusive event. Next year we hope to widen the circle more to include athletic achievements in sports offered for academic credit, such as gymnastics."

The event was sponsored by the Warriors Booster Club and planned by Heather Perry, senior business administration major. To learn more about the Warriors, join the booster club and see results from this year, visit www.ucollege.edu/athletics.

Intramural Awards

Intramural Sportsman:

Daniel Cress

Intramural Sportswoman:

Chelsea Flemmer

All Sports Team:

Daniel Cress,
Kyle Rickard,
Kyle Glass,
Ross Eichele,
Seth Flemmer,
Chelsea Flemmer,
Jared Henry

Officiating

NIRSA level two official:

Andy Ransone

Women's Volleyball

Offensive player of the year:

Baylee Underwood

Defensive player of the year:

Stephanie Krueger

Men's Baskteball

Offensive player of the year:

Travis Kierstead

Defensive player of the year:

Chase Tikker

Women's basketball awards

Offensive player of the year:

Beth-Anne Lapse

Defensive player of the year:

Julia Short

Golf Awards

Best game:

Phil Thompson

Best average:

Phil Thompson

Academic Awards

Men:

Travis Kierstead

Women:

Staci Davenport

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